Barber

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Barber

Samuel. 1910--81, US composer: his works include an Adagio for Strings, adapted from the second movement of his string quartet No 1 (1936) and the opera Vanessa (1958)

barber

[′bär·bər]
(meteorology)
A severe storm at sea during which spray and precipitation freeze onto the decks and rigging of ships.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although he himself did not want to be labeled, Tonsor allied himself with these fusionists and traditionalists.
Esto coincide con otros reportes donde aun cuando el uso de zilpaterol implico un costo anadido de USD 18 despues de ser utilizado por 20 dias, la utilidad adicional alcanzada por los engordadores fue de USD 21 por cabeza (Schroeder y Tonsor, 2011), valor que al igual que los USD 38,9 de utilidad agregada encontrada en el presente estudio es visto como promotor del uso de los aditivos.
For example, Tonsor, Olnyk, and Wolf (2009a) also use WTP as a proxy for consumers' likely voting behavior and report a premium of $1.89 per pound for pork raised without the use of gestation crates, while these authors report a premium of $2.11 per pound in a separate study (Tonsor, Olnyk, and Wolf 2009b).
The use of gestation crates and stalls for swine, as well as laying hen cages for chickens, has been heavily criticized by some groups for being too restrictive for the animals, said Tonsor. In some states, such concerns have resulted in citizen petitions and legislative bills that establish space and/or movement requirements for sows and/or laying hens.
In the story about that triangular (which finally occurred and NYU won "as a result of consistent and conscientious work"), Professor Bouton and coach Tonsor outlined the "lessons to be drawn from Varsity Debating," including "a complete knowledge of current events which in turn implies a thorough reading of periodicals and newspapers" ("Violet Debaters Win," 1915).
Tonsor's claim that the tension in sacred tales of the past derive from "that which the myths of love affirm and that which the myths of power [...] proclaim," William Provost asserts that Tolkien's texts "develop in a deliberate, consistent way both of these categories of myth" (42-3).
I put it to use writing an invited essay on long-time intellectual and active conservative University of Michigan Professor Stephen Tonsor. To begin, I found a concise article on him by historian Gregory Schneider, the recent compiler of an anthology of Tonsor essays.
Tonsor, ed., Reflections on the French Revolution: A Hillsdale Symposium (Washington: Regnery Gateway, 1990), 64.
Tonsor spoke at an event honoring Henry Regnery, who published Art in Crisis.
"Societies," he writes in the first section of the volume, "do not decay and fall into ruin because of what happens to them from the outside but rather as a result of an internal process." One of the most important indicators of social decadence, Tonsor thinks, is the breakdown of traditional political forms, which is itself the result of the decay of aristocratic norms and republican virtue.
119-22) is convincingly argued, although it does not seem likely that the surname of the pseudonym of the author, Johann Tonsor, was meant to be an acronym.