bruxism

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bruxism

[′brək‚siz·əm]
(medicine)
A clenching and grinding of the teeth that occurs unconsciously while the individual is awake or sleeping.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were significant relationships between bruxism, unilateral mastication and chewing gums, pens and pencils, tooth grinding and sleeping on one side and the symptoms and sings of TMJ disorders.
In adults, the most common trigger of tooth grinding is stress.
Dr Nigel Carter from the British Dental Health Foundation says: `Tooth grinding can lead to sore facial muscles, earache, headaches, neck ache and shoulder pain.' And over time, tooth grinding causes enamel damage.
This alternate tooth grinding method grinds the trailing edge, or back angle of the tooth during one grinding plunge.
Tooth grinding to that extent is called sleep bruxism.
Highlighting the manufacturing improvement is the purchase and installation of two Niles/Kapp gear tooth grinding machines.
Bite plates or splints, fitted over the biting surface of your teeth, can also help stabilize the bite and eliminate nocturnal tooth grinding. Muscle relaxants may be prescribed if over-the-counter painkillers don't break the pain/spasm cycle.
People with neurological and neuromuscular disorders, such as cerebral palsy, mental retardation and closed head injuries are prone to salivary incontinence (drooling), and severe bruxing (tooth grinding) habits that may result in excessive wear of teeth and injury to the temporomandibular joint (Richmond, Rugh, Dolfi, et al., 1984).