Tooth-billed Pigeon


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tooth-billed Pigeon

 

(Didunculus strigirostris), the only species of the subfamily Didunculinae of the family Columbidae. The bird is about the size of a rock dove. It has a short tail. The beak is high and narrow, and each side of the gonys has three teeth (hence the name). The head, neck, and underparts are black-green, and the back, wings, and tail are chestnut-red. The tooth-billed pigeon is found in Polynesia on the islands of Upolu and Savai’i (Western Samoa). It lives in forests but is primarily a terrestrial bird. It feeds on fruits and berries. It has been practically exterminated by man and is a protected species.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Mark Vercoe, assistant curator of birds, said: "Along with the Nicobar pigeon and the tooth-billed pigeon, the Victoria crowned pigeon is a descendant of the dodo - a bird that has been famously lost from the planet because of the actions of humans.
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There seems to be variation in the Tooth-billed Pigeon (Didunculus strigirostris) with regard to this character.