torque

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torque,

in physics, that which tends to change the rate of rotation of a body; also called the momentmoment,
in physics and engineering, term designating the product of a quantity and a distance (or some power of the distance) to some point associated with that quantity.
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 of forceforce,
commonly, a "push" or "pull," more properly defined in physics as a quantity that changes the motion, size, or shape of a body. Force is a vector quantity, having both magnitude and direction.
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. The torque produced by rotating parts of an electric motor or internal-combustion engine is often used as a measure of its ability to do useful work. The magnitude of the torque acting on a body is equal to the product of the force acting on the body and the distance from its point of application to the axis around which the body is free to rotate. Only the component of the force lying in the plane of rotation and perpendicular to the radius from the axis of rotation to the point of application contributes to the torque. This radius is called the moment arm, or lever arm. The net torque acting on a body is always equal to the product of the body's moment of inertia about its axis of rotation and its observed angular accelerationacceleration,
change in the velocity of a body with respect to time. Since velocity is a vector quantity, involving both magnitude and direction, acceleration is also a vector. In order to produce an acceleration, a force must be applied to the body.
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. If a body undergoes no angular acceleration, there is no net torque acting on it. Units of torque are units of force multiplied by units of distance, e.g., newton-meters, dyne-centimeters, and foot-pounds (or pound-feet).

Torque

The product of a force and its perpendicular distance to a point of turning; also called the moment of the force. Torque produces torsion and tends to produce rotation. Torque arises from a force or forces acting tangentially to a cylinder or from any force or force system acting about a point. A couple, consisting of two equal, parallel, and oppositely directed forces, produces a torque or moment about the central point. A prime mover such as a turbine exerts a twisting effort on its output shaft, measured as torque. In structures, torque appears as the sum of moments of torsional shear forces acting on a transverse section of a shaft or beam. See Couple

torque

[tȯrk]
(mechanics)
For a single force, the cross product of a vector from some reference point to the point of application of the force with the force itself. Also known as moment of force; rotation moment.
For several forces, the vector sum of the torques (first definition) associated with each of the forces.

torque

That which tends to produce rotation; the product of a force and a lever arm which tends to twist a body, as the action of a wrench turning a nut on a bolt.

torque

torque
Rotation of propeller produces torque.
torque
The illustration shows torque of a propeller. Here 2πrn is the rotational velocity. The direction of the torque is opposite to that of the direction of rotation of propeller.
The moment of force or combination of forces that tends to produce rotational motion. Torque is the counterforce against the engine force that drives a propeller or rotor. It is measured by multiplying the force by its perpendicular distance from the turning point.

torque

1. a necklace or armband made of twisted metal, worn esp by the ancient Britons and Gauls
2. any force or system of forces that causes or tends to cause rotation
3. the ability of a shaft to cause rotation
References in periodicals archive ?
The figure shows the vehicle speed and gradient, engine speed, power consumption of the electric supercharger motor, engine operation point control commands (axis representation in the figure = 1: optimum operation curve or idling, 2:engine full-load torque curve, 3:engine + eSC full-load torque curve), engine torque, electric motor torque, battery SOC, and transition in the fuel efficiency, in chronological order from top to bottom.
The ICE optimum torque curve is not enough to achieve satisfactory overall system efficiency.
This single-cylinder configuration makes for a lighter, more compact and more fuel-efficient power plant that also boasts a supremely usable torque curve.
While the car tops out at 147mph some fine in-gear acceleration translates to a more sporting driver experience consistent with a flat torque curve and a constant delivery of power - perfect conditions for confident overtaking and comfortable long distance cruising.
The system's torque-limiting piston pump is able to sense and react to hydraulic loads, for better utilization of the engine's torque curve. The standard dozer blade features two self-storing extensions that provide a working width of 54 inches.
Petrol direct injection is combined with a turbocharger to deliver convincing performance levels and torque curve despite its smaller displacement.
Not only does it possess oodles of outright power for flat-out acceleration from the start, but there's a relentless stream of low-down power from the unusually flat torque curve. All this adds up to a usable performance that's almost unique in cars of this type of saloon.
where (m) is the slope of the log [DELTA] torque curve.
* Features the new and improved HIOS III hydraulic system, formulated to match the engine's torque curve
These flow rate data are then input into a program provided by the motor manufacturer, which uses the information to develop a torque curve for the motor.
This allows the driver to make fewer gear changes compared with the R8 because of the TDI engine's favourable torque curve.
It's just that the torque curve is different from petrol engines.