Candida utilis

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Related to torula: Torula yeast

Candida utilis

[¦kan·də·də ′yü·də·lis]
(microbiology)
An asexual yeast species used industrially in the production of single-cell protein for food and fodder.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Half of the traps were baited with torula yeast-borax and the other half with CeraTrap; synthetic food-based lures were not included, as Leblanc et al.
Dried torula yeast as a substitute for brewer's yeast in the larval rearing medium for the Mexican fruit fly.
A preliminary test with floral volatiles and torula yeast was conducted in a fallow field with a low silk fly population to determine if traps were effective for silk flies.
El objetivo del presente estudio fue recopilar datos adicionales sobre la captura de una especie estrechamente relacionada, la mosca del melon, Zeugodacus cucurbitae (Coquillett), en trampas cebadas con una solucion de levadura de torula y borax (LTB) (un senuelo de alimento estandard), en trampas cebadas con el tapon del volatil del pepino (VP).
Comparison of Mexican fruit fly (Diptera: Tehpritidae) capture between McPhail traps with torula and Multilure traps with Biolures in South Texas.
The effect of adding torula yeast to the gel formulations was tested by comparing recruitment to HAL gel baits containing combinations of (S)-methoprene 0.25% a.i.
Torula yeast or hydrolyzed proteins are the most commonly used lures to monitor populations of A.
They also capture female Bactrocera and Anastrepha species fruit flies, although it has been shown that for Anastrepha species they may not be as effective as Multilure traps baited with either two-component BioLure (ammonium acetate and putrescine) or with liquid protein baits such as torula yeast/borax (Epsky et al.
All the diets were similar in that they contained a measure of torula yeast, agar, ascorbic acid, sorbic acid, and nipagin (methyl p-hydroxybenzoate).
Cryptococcosis is normally due to the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans also called Filobasidiella neoformans or Torula histolytica.
Kefir grains, used to make the beverage, consist of a symbiotic mix of lactic and acetic acid bacteria (eg Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, and Streptococcus spp.) and yeasts (eg Kluyveromyces, Saccharomyces, and Torula).
The 21 genera were as follows: Ustilago, Trichoconiella, Torula, Tetraploa, Pestalotia, Pantaspora, Mucor, Monacrosporium, Inesiosporium, Graphium, Dactylella, Cylindrocarpon, Paecilomyces, Leptosphaeria, Leptographium, Chaetomium, Cercospora, Spadicoides, Pithomyces, Sphacelotheca, and Pyricularia.