tourniquet

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tourniquet

(to͝or`nĭkĕt, –kā, tûr`–), compression device used to cut off the flow of blood to a part of the body, most often an arm or leg. It may be a special surgical instrument, a rubber tube, a strip of cloth, or any flexible material that can be tightened to exert pressure. Compression should not be maintained for more than 20 min at a time because of the danger of congestion and gangrene. In cases of a bleeding emergency, a tourniquet is used to stop the flow of blood if other means, e.g., the application of a pressure bandage to the wound, are not effective. In arterial hemorrhage (bright red blood spurting out in jets) the tourniquet is applied above the wound, i.e., between the wound and the heart. In hemorrhage from a vein (an even flow of dark red blood) the tourniquet is applied below the wound, i.e., away from the heart.

Tourniquet

 

an elastic rubber tube (tape, bandage, cuff, and the like) for temporarily stopping hemorrhage when there is a wound or during an operation.

The various types of tourniquets used are based on constricting the extremities. A properly applied tourniquet must constrict the arterial trunks, otherwise hemorrhage is intensified owing to cessation of outflow of venous blood. A tourniquet is applied either on clothing or on a layer of cloth (a towel). The more elastic the tourniquet, the less it traumatizes the body tissues. A tourniquet is applied for no longer than two hours; during that time it should be loosened two or three times (more often in winter) to restore the circulation. (The artery should be pressed with a finger when the tourniquet is loosened.)

tourniquet

[′tu̇r·nə·kət]
(medicine)
An apparatus for controlling hemorrhage from, or circulation in, a limb or part of the body, where pressure can be brought upon the blood vessels by means of straps, cords, rubber tubes, or pads.

tourniquet

Med any instrument or device for temporarily constricting an artery of the arm or leg to control bleeding
References in periodicals archive ?
To remove our patient's hair tourniquets, we carefully cut the fibers with hooked Littauer suture-removal scissors and unwrapped the hair.
As a result, the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Fort Belvoir Community Hospital in Bethesda will begin using the HemaClear tourniquet device, and will have it readily available to treat military orthopedic patients.
The length of time that the tourniquets in the cited studies had been in use varied from one day to 4 years.
More commonly reported causes of failed tourniquets are calcified incompressible arteries due to atherosclerosis or Monckeberg's medial calcinosis (Jeyaseelan et al 1981, Bunker & Ratcliffe 1984).
The mothers bravely decide it is easier to dismantle the prams and carry them over the tourniquets, down the stairs to the platform.
The new tourniquet system however, has been created to maximize efficiency, he said.
His blast came as it was revealed Aberdeen Royal Infirmary had put 21,000 patients at risk by reusing the tourniquets.
It is conceivable that the variability you observed was due to hemoconcentration, which can occur from posture changes from recumbent to upright, prolonged tourniquet application, and fist pumping.
Have a group of worker bees search for heavy extremity bleeding and apply pressure dressings or tourniquets.
The Special Operations Forces Tactical Tourniquet (SOFTT), the Army's newest medical device, is being issued to Soldiers serving in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Some told how they had seen him use shoelaces, belts and a tie as tourniquets to bring his veins up.