Toyman


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Toyman

(pop culture)
Pummeling the Metropolis Marvel with perilous playthings, the Toyman has long been one of Superman's craftiest arch-foes. He springs into view—literally, on a flying pogo stick, hopping out of Superman's butterfingered grasp—in Action Comics #64 (1943), in a tale penned by Don Cameron and penciled by Ed Dobrotka. This “publicity- mad as well as money-mad” eccentric is actually Winslow Schott, a tubby, long-maned Gepetto who pulls heists with his sleeping gas–firing mechanical soldiers and explosive-discharging toy truck. When the Toyman endangers nosey reporter Lois Lane with remote-controlled, poison-clawed dolls, Superman zips to her aid in the nick of time and captures the cunning crook. The Toyman vows to return: “How the world will laugh when Superman is defeated by a toy!” True to his word, the Toyman returned for numerous encounters with Superman through comics' Golden Age (1938–1954), with toy-based weaponry such as flying Superman action figures that detonated on contact, acid-blasting water pistols, razorsharp pinwheels, and a jumbo jack-in-the-box that catapulted him through the air. Often assisted by flunkies, the Toyman teamed with Lex Luthor and the Prankster as “the Terrible Trio” in Superman vol. 1 #88 (1954), but their alliance fizzled. Despite the camp humor that dominated much of comics' Silver Age (1956–1969), the Toy-man was irregularly seen during that period. Filmation Studios, however, dusted him off for a trio of 1966 appearances in its The New Adventures of Superman cartoon. By the 1970s Schott had reformed, and in Action #432 (1974) Jack Nimball assumed the toymaker's guise by becoming Toyman II. The physical opposite of Schott, the sprightly Nimball was festooned in a kitschy jester's outfit and appropriated his predecessor's injurious toy gimmicks for a few skirmishes with the Man of Steel. In Superman vol. 1 #305 (1976) the original Toyman reclaimed his title, eliminating Nimball with a booby-trapped cuckoo clock. Toyman II's death didn't stop Hanna- Barbera from using him as one of the Legion of Doom in Challenge of the Super Friends (1978–1979), with Frank Welker voicing the villain. In the comics, Schott made irregular Toyman appearances, one of the most unusual being DC Comics Presents #67 (1984), in which he battled not only the Man of Steel but also the world's most munificent toymaker, Santa Claus. When all things Superman were overhauled beginning with writer/artist John Byrne's continuity-changing The Man of Steel miniseries (1986), the Toyman was also retooled into a darker, more dangerous interpretation. “Toys in the Attic” in Superman vol. 2 #13 (1988) (re)introduced Winslow P. Schott, a successful toy manufacturer driven mad after being put out of business when his company was acquired by Lex Luthor's LexCorp. As the Toyman, the vengeful Schott unsuccessfully targeted Luthor for death with a lethal toy arsenal, and in later tales allied with the criminal organization Intergang and even co-starred in a 1996 one-shot, Superman/Toyman. Schott has been transformed in the twenty-first century into one of DC Comics' creepiest menaces—a registered pedophile, his traditional fascination with children has adopted psychotic implications. A repulsive sight in shaded granny-glasses and close-cropped hair, the Toyman committed his most heinous act in Lex Luthor: Man of Steel #4 (2005): a Timothy McVeigh–like bombing that struck, among other businesses, a children's daycare. Superman vol. 2 #177 (2002) introduced a teenage genius named Hiro Okamura, a Japanese whiz kid who flirted with crime with his high-tech gadgets. In the mid-2000s Okamura, nicknamed “Toyman,” has been on the straight and narrow, under contract by Batman to design crime-fighting weapons. The Toyman was parodied as Quackerjack, a recurring foe played by Michael Bell on the Disney cartoon Darkwing Duck (1991–1995). Sherman Hemsley, best known as television's upwardly mobile dry cleaner George Jefferson, played a live-action— and light-hearted—Toyman in the “Season's Greedings” episode of ABC's Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman (1993–1997). The WB's animated Superman series (1996–2000) included a pair of appearances of a new Toyman, radically redesigned to resemble a marionette; Bud Cort provided the cartoon villain's voice. Despite the Super-foe's appearances in comics and on television, success has escaped the Toyman in one venue that seems obvious given his modus operandi: toys. No Toyman action figures have been produced as of the mid-2000s.
The Supervillain Book: The Evil Side of Comics and Hollywood © 2006 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"He (Toyman) told me that if I went near you ever, he would kill you."
While it's unclear what exactly is going on with Supergirl in the scene, a mysterious woman (Brooke Smith) refers to the superhero as a "dangerous toy." Could this lady be the copycat Toyman?
He didn't want to hang around for The Toyman to be ready, so Richards sent him the catalogue for Arthur Stephenson's dispersal sale and told him to earmark a couple.
I don't think the other horse ever won a race and The Toyman was killed jumping his first fence."
Further, as her metaphor of the 'toyman's warehouse' suggests, this anxiety stems from a fear of consumerism following the French Revolution.
And suspicious of the 'toyman's warehouse' that might be produced by revolutionary philosophy, she emphasizes that the true patriot must be disinterested, even anti-consumerist.
In other words, the violent break with the past which the regicide represents promotes the 'toyman's warehouse' of self-interest Porter fears.
While it's unclear what exactly is going on with Supergirl in the scene, a mysterious woman (Brooke Smith) refers to the city's superhero as a "dangerous toy." Could this lady be the copycat Toyman?
In the (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emrdTfznyfs) trailer for Season 3, episode 14 of the CW series, Toyman (Henry Czerny), aka Winslow Schott Sr., blows himself up at his own funeral, surprising Kara (Melissa Benoist) and the rest of her team.
"No, no, it's a bomb," replies Winn (Jeremy Jordan), who is Toyman's son.
Toyman was first and last seen in Season 1, episode 10, titled "Childish Things." In the said episode, which aired on CBS in 2016, Winn had a disastrous reunion with his dad who escaped prison in order to murder his old boss.
Toyman. Winn's love life also became a part of his storyline in the freshman run when he briefly dated Siobhan Smythe (Italia Ricci), who eventually became the villain known as Silver Banshee.