Toyokuni


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Toyokuni

(tōyō`ko͞onē), 1769–1825, Japanese color-print artist, whose name in full was Toyokuni Utagawa. He was one of the leading masters of the period of the popular ukiyo-e school. After many failures to appeal to the public taste, he attained great success with portrayals of stage favorites in dramatic situations. His work shows vigorous, sweeping lines and striking color contrasts. It attracted numerous imitators and a host of pupils.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yamashita Y, Nagasaka T, Naiki-Ito A, Sato S, Suzuki S, Toyokuni S, Ito M, Takahashi S.
[4.] Umemura T, Hasegawa R, Sai-Kato K, Nishikawa A, Furukawa F, Toyokuni S, et al.
Toyokuni, "Oxidative stress as an iceberg in carcinogenesis and cancer biology," Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, vol.
(9.) Kanatsu-Shinohara M, Ogonuki N, Inoue K, Miki H, Ogura A, Toyokuni S, et al.
(103) Eggens, I., Fendersen, B., Toyokuni, T., Dean, B., Stroud, M.
Potter's The Colour of Rome (1909) and William Loftie's The Colour of London (1914, figure 4) owe more to the watercolours of the French Impressionists than to the likes of Utagawa Toyokuni or Toyohara Kunichika.
A print by the same artist, circa 1860, of a woman in ceremonial dress with two children standing beneath blossom sold for PS160 and a print by Toyokuni of an actress in a blue ceremonial dress sold for PS170.
Toyokuni print of an actress in a blue ceremonial dress, which sold for PS170