Vascular Plant

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Vascular Plant

 

a plant whose organs contain vessels or tracheids, which conduct water and dissolved mineral salts, and sieve tubes, which conduct organic matter. Vascular plants include the Psilotophyta, Lycopodiophyta, Equisetopsida, Pterido-phyta, Gymnospermae, and Angiospermae, that is, all higher plants except mosses and liverworts. In these exceptions, the overall reduction of the sporophyte is also reflected in the disappearance of the conducting system typical of higher plants. In certain older plant classifications, a special taxonomic group of cryptogamic vascular plants was distinguished; it included the Psilotophyta, Lycopodiophyta, Equisetopsida, and Pteridophyta.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Post-meiotic determination of division planes is more typical of sporogenesis in tracheophytes, except for some lycophytes and eusporangiate ferns that undergo monoplastidic meiosis (Brown & Lemmon, 1997).
Distribution of cell-wall xylans in bryophytes and tracheophytes: new insights into basal interrelationships of land plants.
For purposes of further discussion I will assume that Remy's reconstruction of the 'rhyniophyte' life cycle is correct, as are modern phylogenetic reconstructions in which embryophytes and tracheophytes are monophyletic, but 'bryophytes' are paraphyletic.
Therefore, it would be equally parsimonious to invoke an acquisition of non-photosynthetic gametophytes in an ancestor of extant tracheophytes, with a reversion to photosynthesis in the Equisetum/fern lineage, as to invoke two separate origins of non-photosynthetic gametophytes, one in lycopods and the other in a common ancestor of Psilotales and Ophioglossales.
(1973), Al-Houty and Syrett (1984), and Syrett and Al-Houty (1984) determined that charophytes and embryophytes (bryophytes and tracheophytes) utilize the enzyme glycolate oxidase in their photorespiratory pathway; chlorophytes (meaning green algae other than charophytes) utilize glycolate dehydrogenase instead.