tract

(redirected from Tractates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial.

tract

1
1. Anatomy a system of organs, glands, or other tissues that has a particular function
2. a bundle of nerve fibres having the same function, origin, and termination

tract

2
RC Church an anthem in some Masses
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tract

 

in the central nervous system, any one of several groups of closely placed nerve fibers having a common morphological structure and common functions. Tracts are divided by function into associative tracts, which unite various sections of the cerebral cortex in the same hemisphere; commisural tracts, which connect both hemispheres and ensure their cooperative activity; and projection tracts, which unite the cerebral cortex with lower brain formations and, through them, with the periphery.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Tractate A, ps.-Aristotle specifies the following ten bodily sources (genos) that serve as signs (semeion) of a man's character:
One of the conclusions arising from the first study is that the most common and admired structure in the sugyot of Tractate Eruvin is the tripartite structure (Friedman 1978, 41; Jacobs 1983, 138).
(2) Jerusalem Publications of Brooklyn, NY, has translated certain tractates of the Jerusalem Talmud to English, including Shekalim, cited in this paper.
Notwithstanding Goldberg's assertion that his is one of the first attempts at a Mishnah-Tosefta synopsis, there is much to be learned from previous kindred endeavors, ranging from Boaz Cohen's 1935 comparative study of the tractate Shabbat through subsequent work by B.
The Kohlhammer tractates have introductions, lacking in Lieberman's work, which detail the biblical and post-biblical background to each tractate.
Alberdina Houtman has indeed made a most welcome contribution by presenting us with a complete synoptic comparison of two unrelated tractates of the First Order: Berakhot and Shebiit.
The Coptic Gnostic Library includes not only the Nag Hammadi tractates, but also the contents of three additional codices, the Papyrus Berolinensis 8502, the Askew codex, and the Bruce codex, all known prior to 1945.
While these subjects are certainly not absent from the TalmudShabbat itself is the subject of two huge tractates, Shabbat and Eruvinthey do not receive nearly the same degree of attention as questions of purity and impurity, the tahor and the tamei.
The names of the Talmud's tractates are not always a sure guide to their contents.
(Though not exclusively: Nashim also includes tractates devoted to other kinds of vows besides the marital one, including the Nazirite vow.) The first tractate in this Seder, or Order, is Yevamot, which literally means "sisters-in-law." Its particular focus, however, is the practice known as levirate marriage, which is most famous in the Torah from the story of Judah and Tamar.
In that time, we have read hundreds of pages on the laws of Shabbat, in Tractates Shabbat and Eruvin, and learned the laws of most of the other major Jewish holidaysRosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, Pesach and Sukkot and Purim.
Just as a dancer must master an intricate series of movements and postures, so the Jew's daily routine must follow the patterns laid out in the Talmudic tractates: when to pray, what to eat, where and how to move on Shabbat.