Trade Literature


Also found in: Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Trade Literature

 

written and printed works that describe a particular type of practical human activity or the machinery and equipment used in it.

Trade literature disseminates information on the latest advances in material production and in occupations not dealing with the production of material goods, for example, the work of doctors and teachers. It is always intended for a specific group of specialists or for persons who wish to master a given speciality. Trade literature therefore serves both educational and reference purposes and hence its detailed and precise logical organization. The topic is developed according to the sequence of production cycles, operations, or labor procedures. Concrete recommendations are made, but no scientific substantiation is provided, nor are reasons given for the selection of the recommendations. The language of trade literature should correspond in its professional level to the intended reader’s level of preparation. Trade publications soon become outdated owing to scientific and technical progress. This is the reason for the large number of new publications and the frequent appearance of revised editions (approximately every three or four years).

A rapid growth of trade literature was characteristic for the epoch of developing capitalism. Owing to the fierce competition among companies in present-day bourgeois society, the number of publications dealing with practical applications is low and becoming still lower. In socialist society, trade literature is published at a high and stable rate. The publication of trade literature in the developing countries is increasing.

Trade publications include handbooks and manuals, monographs and serial publications, such as Builder’s Library and Economics of Metallurgical Production, and descriptions of new methods in industry. Other types of trade publications are albums of designs and plans, pamphlets, specifications, technological instructions and norms, and operating and servicing instructions. Monographs dealing with applied science and published for advanced study by highly qualified specialists are becoming increasingly common. They reflect the practical results and potential of scientific research and development.

In the USSR, trade literature is published by specialized central publishing houses, of which the largest are Mashinostroenie, Kolos, Nedra, Metallurgiia, Transport, Stroiizdat, and Energiia. It is also published by republic and local publishing houses. In addition to books and pamphlets, the specialized central publishing houses publish specialized trade journals.

REFERENCES

Lenin, V. I. “Tezisy o proisvodstvennoi propagande.” Poln. sobr. soch, 5th ed., vol. 42, pp. 14–15.
Teplov, D. Iu. Tipy i vidy tekhnicheskoi literatury. Leningrad, 1973.
Cherniak, A. Ia. “Lenin i sovetskaia tekhnicheskaia kniga.” In the collection Kniga: Issledovaniia i materialy, collection 20. Moscow, 1970.

B. G. TIAPKIN

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Our research uses a gravity model, which is widely used in the international trade literature. Many economists consider it to be the best tool for conducting applied trade policy.
production data from the United Nations FAOSTAT database, 3) bilateral tariff rates obtained from the World Bank's Trade Analysis and Information System (TRAINS) and the World Trade Organization's Tariff Database, and 4) elasticities from the trade literature measuring the sensitivity of import demand and export supply to prices and the degree of substitution between countries (e.g., how Chinese consumers are willing to substitute U.S.
In the theoretical and empirical trade literature on heterogeneous firms, these disadvantages translate into the problem of low productivity which affects SMEs' exporting behaviour.
The topics include selling by the book: British scientific trade literature after 1800, some considerations about the prices of physics instruments in the 19th century, mathematical instruments changing hands at world fairs 1851-1904, European pocket sundials for colonial use in American territories, and trade in medical instruments and colonialist policies between Mexico and Europe during the 19th century.
Organizational culture is a widely studied phenomenon and has been appearing regularly in the empirical and trade literature since the 1980s.1 Organizational culture is defined as "a pattern of shared basic assumptions learned by a group as it solved its problems of external adaptation and internal integration, which has worked well enough to be considered valid and, therefore, to be taught to new members as the correct way to perceive, think and feel in relation to those problems."2 Organizational culture consists of the following three layers: underlying basic assumptions; espoused beliefs and values; and artifacts, or what we often refer to as organizational climate--the behaviors and symbols of an organization.
Most discussion in the trade literature is about the threat of pure-play online retailing to the traditional brick-and-mortar outlets, such as Walmart, Publix Super Markets Inc.
Regenstein has published numerous scientific articles as well as materials in the trade literature. He leads the Cornell Kosher and Halal Food Initiative, which provides extension/outreach services to the kosher and halal foods sector and was a columnist for many years for KASHRUS Magazine.
For example, the only way to learn about or to acquire some trade literature and unpublished conference papers is to attend the functions at which they are made available.
As we read trade literature and listen to business news, we hear much about the legislative jockeying to shape the future of the secondary mortgage market, particularly of its long-time institutions Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.
The selected bibliography includes manuscript collections, interviews, avian journals, and trade literature.