trade secret

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trade secret

a secret formula, technique, process, etc., known and used to advantage by only one manufacturer
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, any business with confidential, valuable information should develop its cybersecurity practices with protection of its trade secrets in mind.
While many of us might not think of trade secrets (such as the formula for Coca-Cola) as being commonplace, the National Science Foundation estimates that corporations actually employ trade secret protection perhaps two times as often when compared to patents.
Under the DTSA, a business's or individual's trade secrets -- such as copyrights, patents and trademarks -- are federally protected.
Given the recent passage of the Defend Trade Secrets Act ("DTSA") and the EU Trade Secrets Directive (the "Directive"), it is clear that both regions have recognized the substantial value of trade secrets to the global economy and have decided to take analogous stances on the basics of trade secret law, including what constitutes a trade secret and how a violation occurs.
Adam recently co-wrote a series of articles that foreshadowed the passage of the new, federal Defend Trade Secrets Act, and described the Act's real-world implications for companies seeking to protect—and enforce—their trade secret rights.
Under the DTSA, trade secrets encompass all forms and types of financial, business, scientific, technical, economic, or engineering information so long as the owner of the trade secret takes reasonable measures to keep the information secret and the information is valuable because it is not generally known or readily ascertainable through legitimate means.
The umbrella of intellectual property covers patents, copyrights, trademarks and trade secrets.
1890 would provide important protection to the Nation's businesses and industries, including through the establishment of a Federal civil cause of action for trade secret misappropriation, which would effectively build upon current Federal law and various State laws that have largely adopted the Uniform Trade Secrets Act.
It is known as the "Defend Trade Secrets Act," and supporters say it would let companies protect their trade secrets in federal court by a federal private right-of-action.
Section 3, of an SDS, which describes composition information on ingredients, is the place that you going to have problems with maintaining your trade secrets confidentiality.
In contrast, trade secrets often fall in a category of Intellectual Property Rights which are overlooked, since there is no formal application or registration process for trade secrets.
Trade secrets have traditionally been protected in various ways by national laws in the European Union.