Traditional neighborhood development


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Traditional neighborhood development

A development that is based on human-scale design for comfortable walking and may include such elements as alleys, streets laid out in a grid system, buildings oriented to the street, front porches on houses, pedestrian orientation, compatible and mixed luses, and village squares.
References in periodicals archive ?
But things are changing in many progressive cities and towns across the States, with a shift towards creating traditional neighborhood developments.
One answer is for New Jersey to embrace a new development trend called New Urbanism, or Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND).
Traditional neighborhood developments (TNDs) are a response to new urbanist philosophies.
Goldstein, New Urbanism: Planning and Structure of the Traditional Neighborhood Development, 17 PROBATE AND PROPERTY MAGAZINE 8 (Nov./Dec.
While the Urban Infill Tier accommodated two types of Communities (Neighborhoods and Downtowns), the Greenfield Tier has a different Sector Plan for each of the three Communities: Hamlets are regulated by the Conservation Land Development ("CLD") Tier; Villages by the Traditional Neighborhood Development ("TND") Tier; and Town Centers by the Transit Oriented Development ("TOD") Tier.
"Existing (traditional neighborhood developments) have demonstrated that consumers are willing to pay a premium for housing in this type of development," the UALR study said.
Traditional neighborhood developments incorporate the ideals of:
Pennington's defense of the anti-planning, pro-sprawl advocacy coalition, however, relies on: a much too casual dismissal of a variety of empirical evidence showing both a regulatory bias against New Urbanism (NU) and the market acceptance of Traditional Neighborhood Developments (TNDs); an internally inconsistent position regarding the existing relationship between the (imperfect) market and consumer preferences as manifested in the built environment; and a devaluing of the democratic process and the very concept of community in American life.
These are the great old towns Duany turns to for examples of traditional neighborhood development. Here, neighborhoods are grouped within five-minute walking distance of town centers that contain small mixed-use buildings (a corner grocery next to a dentist's office next to a library, for example).
The Smartcode was developed by Traditional Neighborhood Development Partners, the Durham, N.C.
So many of the TND (traditional neighborhood development) houses shrink that porch down to 4 or 5 feet.
That was the impetus for the development of Providence, a TND (traditional neighborhood development) in Mableton, Ga., which is just 15 minutes from downtown Atlanta and 15 to 20 minutes from the airport.
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