Traherne


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Traherne

Thomas. 1637--74, English mystical prose writer and poet. His prose works include Centuries of Meditations, which was discovered in manuscript in 1896 and published in 1908
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| Guisborough Cheerleading Club - PS750 from Zoe Traherne, InBond, towards the costs of travel and entry fees for European Championships for a club that also focuses on trampolining, gymnastics and running.
"Traherne Williams was in charge of his daughter's care and his despicable actions robbed her of her future.
This passage from Traherne which De la Mare quoted in his anthology Behold this Dreamer (1939) conveys what he shared with the seventeenth-century writer: the sense of a transcendent view of the natural world as matter transfused by spiritual meaning.
In her forward, Smith identifies four intellectual developments that hold out particular promise for Traherne scholarship: manuscript studies, biography and life-writing, re-periodization, and heightened political sensitivity.
Traherne's intellectual and spiritual impetus is close to that of
Cambridge Consultants' medical division accounts for 40% of the firm's business and Traherne uses it as an example to illustrate his point.
Delanty's poetry, steeped in the work of Vaughan, Herbert, and Traherne, has always been notable for its elegant and deep formal textures as well as for its wide thematic range.
Many of Archer's most heartfelt personal emotional experiences are coded into his play, and emerge in the Act 4 discussion between Traherne and Lucilla as to the unknowable mysteries of death and life.
Beatrice Tinsley will sing the solo for Once in Royal David's City and visiting professional soprano Danae Eleni, accompanied by her brother Kimon Pallikaropoulos on piano, will sing Wonder from Gerald Finzi's Natalis, a poem by Thomas Traherne.
These nineteen essays examine the close relationship between religion and poetry, including the works of English mystics and Mevlana Jalalu'ddin Rummi, Traherne's intuitive knowledge of "all things" in the Commentaries of Heaven, George Herbert's Anglican manifesto and The Temple, Pope's "Essay on Man," G.M.
Thomas Traherne warns that "Men do mightily wrong themselves when they refuse to be present in all ages," and Edmund Burke laments that when "ancient opinions and rules of life" are discarded, we have no compass to govern us." The arts are damaged, too, since artists are praised only for originality, however crude their works.
The resulting works are intense in their scrutiny, but we are also aware of the possibility of revelations to be found in those trees and skies, rather as the 17th-century priest and poet Thomas Traherne saw the world as 'that body, which the Deity hath assumed to manifest his beauty'.