transept

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transept

(trăn`sĕpt'), term applied to the transverse portion of a building cutting its main axis at right angles or to each arm of such a portion. Transepts are found chiefly in churches, where, extending north and south from the main body, they create a cruciform plan. They may consist of a central portion as wide as the church nave, with two side aisles or with only one. The rectangular or square space formed by the intersection with the nave is termed the crossing. The cross-hall of vaulted Roman basilicas probably inspired the builders of early Christian churches. This position of the transept remained unchanged. In Romanesque churches the transept became universal, while the development of vaulting unified it organically with the body of the building. Its height equaled that of the nave, while the heavy piers of the crossing frequently supported an exterior dome or tower. Transepts furnished additional space for altars and chapels. In some French Gothic cathedrals transepts projected only slightly from the building. Their ends, however, were richly emphasized externally, with sculptured portals and rose windows, as at Chartres and Amiens, or with a tower, as at Le Mans. In England the transepts, furnishing practically the only opportunity for altars, were long and of deep projection. The need for still more space resulted in the frequent provision of a second and minor transept farther east, behind the choir, as at Salisbury.
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Transept

The space that crosses at a right angle to the nave of a building; may be the same size as the nave in a cruciform building, or larger.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

transept

The transverse portion of a church crossing the main axis at a right angle and producing a cruciform plan.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

transept

either of the two wings of a cruciform church at right angles to the nave
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Built primarily in red sandstone with shallow pitched roofs behind crenellated parapets, the lead roof coverings to the Archdeacon's Court and the north transept roofs have reached the end of their life and are in urgent need of renewal.
Transept roof coverings will shortly require renewal due to material failure.
Windows with stained-glass depictions of the Blessed Virgin Mary adorn the left and right transepts.
In the Abbey's north transept, 'not only did he ignore all the past but the thirteenth century, but he destroyed it as well.
And, while the major work was done during the 1990s, the scaffolding and missing ceiling boards on the north transept show that work continues.
The shell of the new sanctuary and transepts had just been completed when the Second World War broke out.
Work is also required to refurbish all areas of the 13th Century church, including the chancel, north and south aisles and north and south transepts.
It seems hardly surprising, then, that such a glorious work as Bach's St John Passion should again resound through the transepts so soon after its last performance here, only a year ago.
Elizabeth in the fourth left (4 L) chapel was followed in 1603 by the Presentation of the Virgin in the Temple in the left transept. There was a plan for Barocci to do a matching Coronation of the Virgin in the right transept but because he was known to take quite a long time painting, this was abandoned.
Work stopped in 1970, leaving blocked arches in the incomplete north transept, only a few bays of the intended cloister, and reinforcement rods protruding vainly from the stump of the crossing tower.