Transjordan


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Transjordan

or

Transjordania:

see JordanJordan,
officially Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, kingdom (2015 est. pop. 8,117,000), 35,637 sq mi (92,300 sq km), SW Asia. It borders on Israel and the West Bank in the west, on Syria in the north, on Iraq in the northeast, and on Saudi Arabia in the east and south.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"In late 1941, when Jews were being carted off to death camps by the trainload, the Irgun dismissed as "anti-Semitic" attempts to offer them safe haven outside of Palestine, and published warnings directed to dissenting Jews not to interfere with Zionists' "God-given right" to rule Palestine and Transjordan."[Quotation]
This was done when Britain established Transjordan as an autonomous province of the Mandate in 1922.
This book offers a series of articles that explore Egyptian interactions with Southwest Asia during the second and first millennium BCE, including long-distance trade in the Middle Kingdom, the itinerary of Thutmose Ill's great Syrian campaign, the Amman Airport structure, anthropoid coffins at Tell el-Yahudiya, Egypt's relations with Israel in the age of Solomon, Nile perch and other trade with the southern Levant and Transjordan in the Iron Age, Saite strategy at Mezad Hashavyahu, and the concept of resident alien in Late Period Egypt complemented by methodological and typological studies of data from the archaeological investigations at Tell al-Maskhuta, the Wadi Tumilat, and Mendes in the eastern Nile delta.
It was founded in Cairo in 1945 by the Kingdom of Egypt, Kingdom of Iraq, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syrian Republic, Transjordan (Jordan from 1946) and North Yemen (later becoming Yemen).
Territories to its south -- Palestine, Transjordan and Iraq -- would go to Great Britain, which mainly sought to protect British interests along the Suez Canal, the main naval route to British India.
Territories to its south -- Palestine, Transjordan, and Iraq -- would go to Great Britain, which mainly sought to protect British interests along the Suez Canal, the main naval route to British India.
Western Europeans called the eastern Mediterranean world "the Orient." This included exotic lands such as Turkey, Syria, Egypt, Palestine, Jordan (or the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan or the Emirate of Transjordan) and beyond.
Simultaneously, after the Conference, Churchill travelled to Jerusalem and met with the Sharif's son, Abdullah, who had been made the ruler, "Emir", of a new territory called "Transjordan." Churchill informed Abdullah that he should persuade "his father to accept the Palestine mandate and sign a treaty to such effect," if not "the British would unleash Ibn Saud against Hijaz."[7] In the meantime the British were planning to unleash Ibn Saud on the ruler of Ha'il, Ibn Rashid.
Archaeologists explore Egyptian interactions with Southwest Asia during the second and first millennia BC, including long-distance trade in the Middle Kingdom, the itinerary of Thutmose III's great Syrian campaign, the Amman Airport structure, anthropoid coffins at Tell el-Yahudiya, Egypt's relations with Israel in the age of Solomon, Nile perch and other trade with the southern Levant and Transjordan during the Iron Age, Saite strategy at Mezad Hashavyahu, and the concept of resident alien in Late Period Egypt.
Once the latter reached its end in 1948, the first Arab-Israeli War broke out, eventually resulting in a totally new map: Israel was formally established as an independent state and the rest of the British Mandate for Palestine was split between Egypt (Gaza) and the area then known as Transjordan (the West Bank).
Hawkins believes that the rapid growth of Israel in Iron I cannot be explained by birth rates, but requires peaceful migration from outside the land and associates the starting point to Transjordan, a theory associated with the name of Anson Rainey.
For noted historian Renzo De Felice Mussolini's stated sympathy for the Muslim world, an area comprising Egypt, the Palestine Mandate, Transjordan, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, and the Arab peninsula, was but an opportunistic move against the rival imperialisms of France and Great Britain.