Transjordan

(redirected from Transjordanian)
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Transjordan

or

Transjordania:

see JordanJordan,
officially Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, kingdom (2015 est. pop. 8,117,000), 35,637 sq mi (92,300 sq km), SW Asia. It borders on Israel and the West Bank in the west, on Syria in the north, on Iraq in the northeast, and on Saudi Arabia in the east and south.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Transjordanians monopolize the state apparatus; they staff the civil service, armed forces, and security organs, and they are considered the core constituency for the ruling Hashemite monarchy.
Some powerful Transjordanians reject a fully representative Parliament that might see Islamists and Jordanians of Palestinian origin dominate the political-economic system, especially since the Muslim Brotherhood's base is disproportionately among Palestinian-Jordanians.
In this sense, the Jordan First motto is in parallel with the 'East Bank First' trend of Transjordanian nationalists adopted in the aftermath of the civil war dating back to the early 1970s.
Transjordanian forces destroyed or forced evacuation of at least 12 Jewish communities in Judea-Samaria and occupied Jerusalem's Old City and Temple Mount.
Abdullah negotiated a new Anglo-Transjordanian treaty, ending the British Mandate and gaining full independence for Transjordan, on March 22, 1946; on May 25, 1946, the Transjordanian parliament proclaimed Abdullah king, while officially changing the name of the country from the Emirate of Transjordan to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.
The government announced that redistricting would address some of the earlier inequalities, but in fact the distribution of the additional seats maintained the advantage of the largely pro-regime Transjordanian south at the expense of the more oppositional--and Palestinian-populated--regions in and around Amman.
(10) A phenomenon explored in the radically different Transjordanian setting by Joseph A.
In 1949 King Abdullah of Transjordan (now Jordan) indicated Transjordan's intention to absorb the West Bank, which was occupied by the Transjordanian army, but after strong protestations by other Arab states he agreed that Transjordanian administration would last only until the Palestinians were able to establish a united Palestinian state.
The lack of other examples is something Israel shares with the Transjordanian, Phoenician, neo-Hittite and Aramaean states.
Technically and juridically, the Transjordanian emirate remained part of Palestine, under nominal control of the British high commissioner in Jerusalem, and officially the Mandate remained in force there.
However, even for the Ghassulian Chalcolithic, we have to recognize that this region was a pathway of exchange if we take into consideration that basalt bowls and tools most probably originating at Yarmukian, Transjordanian, or Tiberian sources were found at several sites (e.g., Williams-Thorpe and Phillip 1993).
Simultaneously, the Jewish Agency issued a statement expressing "horror and disgust" at the "barbaric" behaviour of the IZL and Lehi in Deir Yassin, and sent a cable to Transjordanian ruler King Abdullah, expressing regrets and condolences for what had happened.