Transplanting and Planting Machine

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Transplanting and Planting Machine

 

a machine for planting roots (seedlings or matrices) of sugar beets in square-cluster plantings. The main components of the trans-planting and planting machine used in the USSR are furrow openers, planting devices, hoist and drive machinery, and a hopper. These are mounted on a frame resting on front and rear rubber-tired wheels (which compact the soil around the root). In operation, two planters sit opposite each other on each planting machine and set roots into planting tubes that drop them into a furrow formed by the furrow openers. As the tube leaves the furrow, the root, pressed by a heel, spreads the flaps of the tube, overcomes the resistance of a spring, and remains in the furrow. After this operation, the flaps close under pressure of the spring. Then covering de-vices cover the planted roots with soil. The transplanting and planting machines are used with 3-ton tractors. Their working parts are activated from the tractor’s power takeoff. A transplanting and planting machine is operated by a tractor driver, machine operator, and eight planters and sets out matrices 50 to 120 mm in diameter and 120 to 150 mm long. The machine can plant 0.85 hectares per hour and replaces the hand labor of more than 100 workers.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.