Transposing Instruments


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Transposing Instruments

 

musical instruments for which parts are notated higher or lower, by a fixed interval, than the actual notes produced by the instrument. Transposing instruments are generally wind instruments. Those with variants pitched in a variety of keys can be played in any key without changing the fingering or technique of sound production when the new instrument is substituted. Transposing instruments simplify notation by reducing the need for lines added to the staff or for accidentals.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2.) Anthony Baines, "Transposing Instruments," in The New Oxford Companion to Music, ed.
(15.) "Transposing instruments," Grove Music Online, at 3(v), "Other [brass] band instruments."
(18.) "Transposing instruments," in Grove Music Online, at 3, "Brass."
Students who play transposing instruments often make the mistake of using the same process as when transposing for their instrument in orchestra rehearsal.
* Most transposing instruments sound lower than the notated pitch.
Once students clearly grasp the concept of playing transposing instruments at the piano, I usually present them with various groupings from band or orchestral scores.
Then locate the note name of the transposing instrument (B-flat, E-flat, F and so forth) in its first position below middle "C" (or above middle "C" in the rare instance of a soprano instrument).