Trap Bands

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Trap Bands

 

broad bands (15-20 cm wide) of plaited straw, heavy paper, matting, shavings, and other materials that are placed in rings on the trunks and large branches of trees to capture and exterminate plant pests that usually winter or pupate under the old bark. They are used principally in orchards to combat the caterpillars of codling moths, pearmoths, plum moths, weevils, and other pests.

Trap bands are tied to the trunk of a tree below the crown with twine and bast, usually at a height of 1–1.5 m. Most are treated with insecticides; when nontoxic bands are used, the insects are exterminated by mechanical means. Before the bands are applied, dead bark and lichens are removed from the tree trunks. With the arrival of winter the trap bands are taken down and burned. Sometimes sticky bands treated with special glue are attached to the tree trunks. The glue is applied on flat strips of paper or on the trunks of the trees in a band 4–5 cm wide. Trap bands are effective primarily on small surfaces where chemical methods of combatting insect pests are impossible or unprofitable.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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[40], can be explained assuming that, in presence of nanoparticles, shallow trap bands are formed, which either distribute or replace the original trap band, especially at high filler loadings.
The increase in resistivity, instead, may be attributed to the creation of new trap bands, deeper than the original trap band of the base polymer.
In our case, considering the relatively low value of the applied electric field intensity, the increase in electrical resistivity with filler content does not sensibly contribute to a reduction of tg[delta] values with respect to the neat polymer, probably because the effects of deeper trap bands are high-field phenomena.