Trapeznaia

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Trapeznaia

 

(1) A refectory for monks; one of the main structures of a Christian monastery. The trapeznaia usually included a hall for the monks’ common meals and a chapel, as well as other rooms, such as a kitchen and pantry. Stone trapeznye were first built in Russian monasteries in the 15th century, after the introduction of communal monastic rules. At first trapeznye had single- and double-columned halls, but in the 17th century the halls were built without columns. The structures also had gul’bishcha (outdoor galleries at the level of the ceiling of the first floor) and richly decorated furniture, for example, in the St. Sergius Trinity Monastery.

(2) A spacious low extension from the western side of a Christian church, originally used to serve the needs of parishioners. Trapeznye are typical of Russian architecture of the second half of the 17th century.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.