Trawl Line


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Trawl Line

 

a steel cable used to tow a trawl. The thickness of the cable used for the trawl line depends upon the tractive pull developed by the trawler. For example, big trawlers like the BMRT (large refrigerator and freezer trawler) need lines 26.5 mm in diameter; medium-sized trawlers like the SRT (medium freezer trawler) use lines 22.0 mm. Markers are attached to the line at 50-m intervals. The line is kept wound on windlass barrels.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Newspapers tried to maintain their enthusiasm; the Weekly Herald, for example, in relating that the Conception and Trinity Bays fisheries had been very bad, continued to hope that increased use of trawl lines, just then being introduced at Trinity, would lead to a more successful autumn fishery.
The destruction of trawl lines, the assaults on their owners, and the obstruction of cod seines do call to mind the much more famous English Luddite protests against the introduction of machinery to the textile industry.
Others, as did Kelson, believed that new methods such as seines and trawl lines were directly responsible by scaring off or diverting the migratory habits of cod.
Official support for new technology, especially trawl lines, stemmed from the manner in which Newfoundland's main competitor, France, had successfully employed bultows in a reinvigorated migratory fishery on the Grand Banks off Newfoundland after 1815.
The Newfoundland government's attempt to encourage the use of bultows in the bank fishery reflected in part its knowledge of the successful catches by the trawl lines used in Conception Bay, even as the overall catch of the old inshore areas appeared to be "less than one fifth of the average quantity caught twenty five years ago." (79) The Bounty Act came into effect despite warnings from merchants such as Robert Pack of Carbonear, who testified before a select committee of the House of Assembly in 1845, that the use of bultows on the Grand Banks represented a new, more intensive exploitation of the largest cod which congregated there.
By the end of the 19th century, cod traps and gill nets had joined cod seines, jiggers and trawl lines in the arsenal which fishing people used yearly to assail cod stocks.