Trench Foot


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Related to Trench Foot: immersion foot

Trench Foot

 

a foot disorder resulting from prolonged exposure to cold and dampness and resembling frostbite. Trench foot occurs at above-freezing temperatures. The condition, which was first described at the time of World War I, was observed among soldiers who spent long periods in damp trenches. Mild cases of trench foot are marked by painful numbness in the feet as well as edema and reddening of the skin; cases of moderate severity, by serohemorrhagic blisters; and extreme cases, by necrosis and associated infection of the internal tissues.

Hospital treatment of trench foot includes immobilization, novocaine blocking, anticoagulants, physiotherapy, and surgery when indicated.

References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "There were problems with trench foot. A lot of doctors didn't know how to deal with it, as they hadn't had it since the First World War.
At the other end of the spectrum, wet weather can lead to cases of trench foot - when feet are wet for a long time, causing tingling, swelling and pain.
Further, the landing force was inexplicably unprepared to cope with hypothermia, trench foot, and frostbite.
During the winter of 1914-15 over 20,000 men in the British Army were treated for trench foot.
Former Navy medic Dr Andy Ashworth fears Australian doctors may not be aware of the dangers of trench foot ...
After a spell on THEWESTERN Front, he was invalided home with trench foot but later returned to the fighting and was reported missing on April 11, 1918.
"I think it was because of trench foot during the First World War," Ken recalled back in 2004.
As for me - I've not returned to Glastonbury after picking up what I'm still convinced was actual trench foot in 1998.
Carry someone to the first-aid tent who has either overdone it or has sunstroke or trench foot.
As Phyllis Bembridge says, it takes away the focus from four years of horrific war, from the murderous machine guns, the barbed wire, the howitzers, the bombs, the constant bombardments, the mud, the fleas, trench foot disease, the awful gas attacks, the "over the top" advances, the wounded and dying and the firing squads for "cowardice".
Dr Rob Atenstaedt, from the North Wales Public Health Team, has spoken about the horrors of trench diseases such as trench foot and fever.