Trenton


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Trenton,

town (1991 pop. 16,908), SE Ont., Canada, on the Bay of Quinte at the mouth of the Trent River and at the south end of the Trent Canal. Its manufactures include textiles, electronic components, and paper and steel products. A Royal Canadian Air Force base is to the east.

Trenton.

1 City (1990 pop. 20,586), Wayne co., SE Mich., on the Detroit River opposite Grosse Ile, in a farm area; settled 1816, inc. as a city 1957. An early river port, it has plants that make metal products, chemicals, and transportation equipment.

2 City (1990 pop. 88,675), state capital (since 1790) and seat (since 1719) of Mercer co., W N.J., at the head of navigation on the Delaware River; settled by Friends 1679, inc. as a city 1792. Situated between Philadelphia and New York City, it is an important transportation hub. Its pottery industry dates from Colonial times. Other leading manufactures include metal products, rubber goods, textiles, and plastics. Trenton's population and industrial production declined in the late 20th cent.; however, there was suburban development, especially to the city's northeast.

The settlement was first called the Falls, then Stacy's Mills, and finally Trenton. In the American Revolution, Trenton was the scene of a battle when Washington crossed (Dec. 25, 1776) the ice-clogged Delaware and surprised and captured (Dec. 26) 918 Hessians. The Americans, avoiding a British relief force led by Cornwallis, then struck at Princeton. A 155-ft (47-m) granite monument topped by a statue of Washington commemorates the battle, and the place where the Americans crossed the Delaware is marked in a state park. Trenton grew as a commercial center and became the site of many industries; the famous Roebling Works, where wire rope was manufactured, was established in 1848.

The city's noteworthy buildings include the golden-domed capitol (1792), much remodeled and enlarged; the capitol annex (1931); the state cultural center, with a museum, planetarium, and state library; the World War I memorial building (1932); the old barracks, built in 1758 and restored as a museum; and the William Trent House (1719), the city's oldest standing building, also a museum. The explorer Zebulon PikePike, Zebulon Montgomery,
1779–1813, American explorer, an army officer, b. Lamberton (now part of Trenton), N.J. He joined the army (c.1793) and was commissioned second lieutenant in 1799.
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 was born in Lamberton, now part of Trenton. The city is the seat of the College of New Jersey; Rider Univ. is in nearby Lawrenceville.

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Trenton

 

a city in the northeastern part of the USA; capital of New Jersey. Population, 100,000 (1975; with suburbs, 320,000). Trenton is a transportation junction and a port on the Delaware River, accessible to seagoing vessels. Industry includes machine building, metalworking, food processing, and ferrous metallurgy. Silicate ceramics, rubber goods, chemicals, and textiles are produced locally. As of 1973, industry employed 40,000 persons. Princeton University is located in one of the suburbs of Trenton.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Trenton

Washington’s brilliant surprise attack galvanized American morale (1776). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 508]
See: Battle
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Trenton

a city in W New Jersey, capital of the state, on the Delaware River: settled by English Quakers in 1679; scene of the defeat of the British by Washington (1776) during the War of American Independence. Pop.: 85 314 (2003 est.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Trenton police spokesman Captain Stephen Varn said that five men and five women injured in the gunfire were rushed to the hospital.
l Trenton Makes, published in hardback by Atlantic Books, PS12.99 (ebook PS5.69), is available now.
Linda Helm Krapf, Executive Director of Trenton's Children's Chorus, states, "This award from S3 is the perfect gift at the perfect time for Trenton Children's Chorus.
Based in Trenton, Texas, First National Bank of Trenton is a community bank with five locations that serve towns throughout North Texas, including Trenton, Melissa, Bonham, Farmersville, and Leonard.
Chrysler Group LLC, a United States-based automaker, is investing USD52m in its engine plants in Trenton and Dundee, Michgan.
The Trenton Six were a group of African American men from New Jersey likely wrongfully accused of murdering a secondhand store owner, William Horner, on January 27, 1948.
What I Trenton was about was injustice of privilege which blight this This was a truly inspiring film about actor Michael Sheen's contemporary vision of the Passion of Christ played out in his home town which has been ravaged by the excesses of industrial and economic greed.
These tomato pie restaurants, along with a score of others serving tomato pie, are concentrated around a Trenton neighborhood called Chambersburg or "The Burg." Chambersburg, in the south part of Trenton, has welcomed many ethnic groups in the last few centuries.
In this photographic essay, Richman (practicing attorney, VP of the NJ State Museum) employs an examination of Trenton, New Jersey in a broader analysis of the nature and status of cities--especially small, formerly industrial cities--in the post-industrial 21st-century.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-November 1, 2010-CLEAR 4G WiMAX service now available in Trenton, NJ(C)1994-2010 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
With a nod toward the state's geography, Shore to Shore Community Federal Credit Union is the new name planned for a credit union from the merger of two Detroit-based CUs, the $55 million Trenton FCU and the $81 million Wyandotte FCU.
(05 March 1922, Murray Township, Northumberland County, Ontario-19 Mary 2008, Trenton, Ontario)