Triatominae

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Triatominae

[trī·ə′täm·ə‚nē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The kissing bugs, a subfamily of hemipteran insects in the family Reduviidae, distinguished by a long, slender rostrum.
References in periodicals archive ?
12) Pippin inspected 142 wood rat dwellings and collected 229 triatomines, of which the majority were T.
24) Diaz-Ungria, 1968 (11) also noticed that the most infectious material in oral experiments were those obtained from feces of triatomines.
Biogeography and evolution of Amazonian triatomines (Heteroptera: Reduviidae): implications for Chagas disease surveillance in humid forest ecoregions.
Nevertheless, although the infestation of many palm species has been widely reported for Venezuela, there are few reports of Coccus nucifera (coconut palm) as an appropriate vegetal niche for triatomines (4-10).
Biology, diversity and strategies for the monitoring and control of triatomines --Chagas disease vectors.
A questionnaire was administered to determined housing conditions, and entomological indices for triatomines were calculated for both the intra- and peridomiciliary areas.
Several haematophagous triatomines are regarded as vectors of Chagas disease in Latin America, (Schofield 1994, Aldana and Lizano 2004); some of them are sylvan and there is a lack of information on their natural behavior and habitat.
The evolutionary age of blood-sucking triatomines has been a controversial and debated topic, primarily due to the lack of any fossil evidence.
Nymphs of triatomines used for this purpose were reared on chicken, refractory to this parasite.
Many of these papers dealt with the triatomine (Reduviidae) vectors of Chagas'disease, a trend which continued in the 1960's (nine papers on triatomines were published from 1963 to 1967).
Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is mainly transmitted to humans and other mammals by blood-sucking insects called triatomines (also known as kissing bugs).
Vectorborne transmission occurs through contamination of the bite site or mucous membranes with feces of infected hematophagous triatomines ("kissing bugs").