Trichodectidae

Trichodectidae

 

a family of parasitic insects of the order of biting lice (Mallophaga). They have a flattened body, from 0.8 to 10 mm in length. They are wingless and have dense integuments, and their oral parts are adapted to gnawing. They live in the hair of mammals, feeding on the keratotic parts of the skin. Some gnaw their way through the skin until they draw blood. Their development takes place in the animal host. They are widespread, and in the USSR there are about 100 species. Certain species are associated with domestic animals, such as dogs, cats, horses, and cattle. Trichodectidae are harmful to livestock husbandry. The dog-biting louse (Trichodectes canis) and the cat-biting louse (T. subrostratus) are intermediary hosts of the Cestoidea class—the double-pored dog tapeworm (Dipylidium caninum). The insects are combated by applying a 1 percent water solution of Chlorophos or a 1.5 percent emulsion of Polychlorpinene; in the winter one applies a 3 percent powder of these preparations. [5-4391.4]

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