Trichomonas


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Trichomonas

 

a genus of unicellular organisms of the class Mastigophora. The body is pear-shaped, with four (sometimes three) flagella on the anterior end; a single flagellum trails backward along the outer margin of a thin cytoplasmic membrane that connects this flagellum to the body and with it forms an undulating membrane. An elastic supporting rod, or axostyle, runs through the organism’s entire body. The nucleus is situated in the anterior part of the body.

Trichomonads reach 20 microns in length. They infest the digestive tract and sexual organs of a number of vertebrates. Three species are parasitic in man: T. vaginalis, which causes inflammation, and T. tenax and T. hominis, which inhabit the oral cavity and lumen of the small intestine, respectively; there is some doubt as to the pathogenic role of the latter two species. T. foetus is parasitic in the genital tract of cattle, causing early miscarriage, sterility, and various types of inflammation.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1/5.8S/ITS2 and small subunit ribosomal RNA confirmed that Trichomonas gypaetinii was the etiologic agent.
Trichomonas vaginalis was detected by MWD-ONE and Anyplex PCR in 3 out of 110 (2.73%) samples.
The researchers found that 79 patients had positive urine test results for chlamydia, gonorrhea, or trichomonas, with a 27.4 percent sexually transmitted infection rate.
Literature review of prevalence of trichomoniasis: For this systematic review, electronic searches in international and national databases and journals were conducted using key words of Trichomonas vaginalis, general population, prevalence, epidemiology, and Iran.
Targeted public health education about Trichomonas will be critical," said Aaron Tobian, the study's senior author.
Our search resulted in 5 parasite species with demonstrated presence in seminal fluid of humans: Entamoeba hystolytica (3), Schistosoma haematobium (4), Trichomonas vaginalis (2), Trypanosoma cruzi (5), and Toxoplasma gondii; the latter has been documented as sexually transmitted among animals, but not humans (6) (Table).
One should emphasize, however, that one of the four parts of the new Bethesda classification specifies such inflammatory lesions as: Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Actinomyces, Chlamydia, cellular changes consistent with HSV infection, and changes of bacterial flora.
Trichomonas gallinae parasitizes a variety of avian orders especially in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica, Order Columbiformes).
The second is a cross-sectional study in asymptomatic HIV-positive women comparing ICC with culture to diagnose Trichomonas vaginalis.