Trichoplax Adhaerens

Trichoplax Adhaerens

 

a primitive multicellular marine animal of the group Phagocytellozoa. The leaflike body measures approximately 3 mm in length and consists of an external layer of cells with flagella and internal parenchyma formed of amoeboid cells. The organism reproduces both sexually and asexually. It is similar in structure to a phagocytella, which was considered the common ancestor of all multicellular animals by E. Metchnikoff.

References in periodicals archive ?
The team, led by Professor Chris Schofield at the University of Oxford, has found that humans share a method of sensing oxygen with the world's simplest known living animal -- Trichoplax adhaerens -- suggesting the method has been around since the first animals emerged around 550 million years ago.
Professor Chris Schofield and his team found that humans share a method of sensing oxygen with the world's simplest known living animal - Trichoplax adhaerens - a discovery, which throws light on how humans sense oxygen and how oxygen levels drove the very earliest stages of animal evolution.
We think this is what drove the ancesters of Trichoplax adhaerens to develop a system to sense a lack of oxygen in any cell and then do something about it.
In selecting the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens for sequencing, the NHGRI panel noted that placozoans are simple in yet another way.