Tridacna


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Related to Tridacna: Tridacna squamosa

Tridacna

 

a genus of large bivalve mollusks that inhabit the coastal zone of tropical seas. There are several species, the best-known of which is the giant clam (T. gigas), which inhabits the Pacific. Its shell measures as much as 1.4 m in length and weighs as much as 250 kg. The valves of the shell are identical and very thick, without a nacreous layer. They are marked by radial plication, coarse scales, and ribs on the surface. The inhabitants of the islands of Oceania use the shells as building materials. They also use them to make household utensils, ornaments, and amulets. In addition the shells serve as money for local trade.

References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper, we report surveys of allozyme variation in Tridacna maxima populations sampled throughout the species range in the west Pacific from Australia to Polynesia to test [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE 1 OMITTED] whether the northwest to southeast trend in gene flow perpendicular to major surface currents found in T.
(1988) studied gonad maturation of the giant clam Tridacna gigas (Linnaeus, 1758) (subfamily Tridacninae) by qualitatively characterizing the maturity stages of male and female tissues.
In the Fatu-ma-Futi assemblage, several of the largest taxa, such as Tridacna, Turbo, and Trochus are found living on the hard substrate or nearby coral sand of coral reef habitats.
(2006) examined how light intensity and water temperature influence the symbiosis rates of Tridacna crocea, Tridacna derasa, and Tridacna squamosa.
KEY WORDS: giant clam, Tridacna noae, Tridacna maxima, demographics, density, distribution, management, Papua New Guinea
Meanwhile, log-phase cultures of the following isolates of Symbiodinium were harvested and washed in FSW by centrifugation at 1000 X g for 5 mm: (1) TC2A, a clonal isolate from the tridacnid clam Tridacna crocea (see isolate PHQU TC2A from Baillie et al., 1998); (2) HH2A, a clonal isolate from the tridacnid clam Hippopus hippopus (see isolate PHSC HH2A from Baillie et al., 1998); (3) HA3-5, a clonal isolate of a free-living isolate from Hawaiian subtidal sands (see Carlos et al., 1999); (4) CS164, a clonal isolate from the anemone Aiptasia tagetes (culture purchased from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation [CSJRO], Australia); and (5) CS 156, a clonal isolate from the stony coral Montipora verrucosa (culture purchased from CSIRO).
KEY WORDS: salinity, giant clam, Tridacna gigas, stress response, clearance rate, absorption efficiency
From 1976 onwards (Green 1976, 1979, 1991a: Table 3) two Tridacna marine shell radiocarbon determinations have been available as an indication of the approximate age of the SE-SZ-8 dentate-decorated Lapita site of Nanggu, on the island of Nendo or Santa Cruz, in the Outer Eastern Islands of the Solomons.
These bivalves include all of the species in the subfamily Tridacninae, including the well-known genera of larger clams, Tridacna and Hippopus, as well as less well-known genera of much smaller clams in the subfamily Fraginae, such as Corculum and Fragum (Kawaguti, 1950, 1983; Schneider, 1998).
The biggest clam in the nursery is a 98.3-centimeter long Tridacna gigas and the shortest is a 3-cm juvenile.
In addition, no basophilic granulocytes were observed in the giant clam (Tridacna crocea) (Nakayama et al.