Trilateration


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trilateration

[trī‚lad·ə′rā·shən]
(engineering)
The measurement of a series of distances between points on the surface of the earth, for the purpose of establishing relative positions of the points in surveying.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Trilateration

 

a method of determining geodetic control points. Trilateration consists in the construction of a chain or network of interconnected triangles in a given area and the measurement of all three sides of each triangle. The angles of the triangles and the coordinates of their vertices are determined by trigonometric computations. The sides of the triangles are measured with range-only radar or electrooptical range finders. Trilateration has the same purpose as triangulation.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

trilateration

A surveying method in which the lengths of all sides of a chain of triangles, polygons, or quadrilaterals (or any combination of them) are measured with an electronic instrument; the angles then may be computed from these field measurements.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

triangulation

The use of two known coordinates to determine the location of a third. Used by ship captains for centuries to navigate on the high seas, a form of triangulation known as "trilateration" is employed in GPS receivers to pinpoint their current location on earth. Trilateration is also used by cellular phone carriers to identify a caller's location for emergency 911 services.

Triangulation vs. Trilateration
Tri-ang-ulation deals with the measurement of the angle of the triangle formed between the observer and two known locations. Tri-lat-eration deals with the distances between observer and locations and is closer to what GPS navigation systems actually do. GPS uses three and four known locations from satellites to pinpoint the person or vehicle. See GPS and E911.
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References in periodicals archive ?
They carry out proof-of-concept attacks by employing Android virtual machines to fabricate fake locations to get the coarse-grained distances of target persons and then calculate the precise location using iterative trilateration. Leveraging Android virtual machines to fabricate fake locations are not so efficient as directly sending bulk packets carrying fake locations to the app server by exploiting the insecure communication.
Liu, "Quality of trilateration: Confidence-based iterative localization", IEEE Trans.
At these local sensor nodes, trilateration algorithm [13] is used for target localization in our proposed approach.
Trilateration refers to the process of calculating a node's position based on measured distances between itself and a number of anchor points with known locations.
(5) Given four fixed node coordinates, and through the TOA-based distance measurement method can get the distances between them and the moving node, again through the trilateration it can calculate the moving node coordinate.
Once the router recognises the remote sensor's ID (by RF) and distance (by response pulse), the geographic coordination of the remote sensor can be obtained by trilateration technique that uses two or more ZigBee routers to determine the coordination of the tags.
Your satnav's job is to use radio waves to locate the satellites, figure out the distance to each, and use this information to deduce its own location using a mathematical principle called 3D trilateration.
Location can then be derived through the processes of trilateration or multilateration.
These two distances for each stopping location were used to compute, by way of trilateration, the coordinates of the stopping location relative to the viewing location (see Fukusima, Loomis, & Da Silva, 1997).
This process is called trilateration and is used by the GPS unit's receiver to calculate the latitude and longitude position of this point.