Trimalchio


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Trimalchio

vulgar freedman gives lavish feast for noble guests. [Rom. Lit.: Satyricon]
References in periodicals archive ?
This summer, however, begins on a different note when she becomes enthralled in the drama that wealthy and mysterious Jacinta Trimalchio brings by moving into the mansion next door.
This passage operates on two levels: it reinforces the reader's perception of Trimalchio as a boorish lout, while serving as a symbol of Trimalchio's lack of control over death.
Scott Fitzgerald, originalmente intitulado Trimalchio ou Trimalchio in West Egg, propostas por dois autores de referencia em areas tao distintas como Nikolai Endres e Niall Slater.
Critic and biographer Arthur Mizener explains Fitzgerald's important turn, saying, "His use of a narrator allowed Fitzgerald to keep clearly separated for the first time in his career the two sides of his nature, the middle-western Trimalchio and the spoiled priest who disapproved of but grudgingly admired him" (185).
As the author of We Fished All Night (1951), he picked an even worse title than Trimalchio in West Egg, which Scott Fitzgerald reluctantly rejected in favour of The Great Gatsby.
Jay Gatsby, Trimalchio in West Egg, with the last guest departed, floats in the swimming pool, on the last day of summer, waiting for the delayed rendezvous.
Astington demonstrates through this example how an apprentice might perform onstage alongside his master; for example, Cane played Trimalchio to his apprentice John Wright's Millicent.
Now, though, everybody knows he's not called Tony Clifton, Top Cat or Trimalchio Chiaroscuro and he's getting grief from all directions.
Critics have noted, superficially, that Nick's reference to Trimalchio seems apt enough: In the "Dinner with Trimalchio" section of the Satyricon, Trimalchio hosts wild, orgy-like parties that serve merely as a venue for his ostentatious display of wealth; like Trimalchio, Gatsby seems more interested in orchestrating his parties and displaying his wealth than in his guests.
and death theme so prominent at the later cena of Trimalchio in
This value pervades the scenes in which Nick envisions him as a Trimalchio in West Egg who, like his predecessor in Petronius' Satyricon, is a nouveau riche, eager to emulate his social superiors and given to a conspicuous display of wealth (MacKendrick 1950).