Trinidad

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Trinidad

(trēnēthäth`), town (1983 est. pop. 43,500), Sancti Spíritus prov., central Cuba. Tobacco processing is the chief industry, although other agricultural processing has been developed. During the colonial period, Trinidad flourished as a port and was attacked several times by the British. The town is a living relic of the colonial period and has been declared a national monument and UNESCO World Heritage site.

Trinidad

 

an island in the Atlantic Ocean, off the northeastern coast of South America; the main part of the state of Trinidad and Tobago. Area, 4,800 sq km. Population, more than 800,000 (1971).

Of continental origin, Trinidad is separated from the mainland by the Dragon’s Mouth, the Gulf of Paria, and the Serpent’s Mouth. The shores are weakly indented and are framed by coral reefs to the north; there are mangrove forests on the southern shores. A mountain range in the north has elevations to 940 m at Mount Aripo. Most of the island is a low-lying plain, which is marshy in the east, with two low, parallel ranges that have elevations to 300 m. There are mud volcanoes along the southern shore. Trinidad has deposits of natural asphalt, such as Pitch Lake; oil, on the continental shelf in the southwest and southeast; and natural gas. The climate is subequatorial. The monthly average temperature is 25°–27°C; annual precipitation ranges from 1,200 mm in the west to 3,800 mm in the northeast, which is exposed to the trade winds. Evergreen forests predominate; there are thin forests in the northwest.

E. N. LUKASHOVA


Trinidad

 

a city in Cuba, in southern Las Villas Province. Population, 31,500 (1970). Founded in 1514, Trinidad has been declared a national monument. The city’ streets, laid out in a grid pattern, are lined with one-story yellow and pink houses with wooden and metal window gratings. In the city center there are houses and churches dating from the turn of the 19th century, for example, the Brunet Palace (1812) and the Church of San Francisco de Asís (1787–1811). Local industries produce cigars and cigarettes, paper, and footwear. After 1959, Trinidad became a tourist and vacation center.

REFERENCE

Varona, E. A. de. Trinidad de Cuba. Havana, 1946.

Trinidad

an island in the West Indies, off the NE coast of Venezuela: colonized by the Spanish in the 17th century and ceded to Britain in 1802; joined with Tobago in 1888 as a British colony; now part of the independent republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Pop.: 1 208 282 (2000)
References in periodicals archive ?
Panthers were led to believe there would be no obstacles to him playing in the BBL as it appeared he was a mainstay of Trinidadian domestic scene and an international.
These analyses suggest that in this sample of Trinidadians, the ADH1B*3 allele has a protective effect against development of alcoholism; however, in people who do become alcohol dependent, the allele is associated with an enhanced risk for liver disease (Ehlers et al.
We hope the barrel bonus will act as an extra incentive for the players as there are few Trinidadians that don't like a drop of rum and these casks hold the best in the world.
Trinidadian Thomas, who lived in Melford Road in the Bilborough area of Nottingham, will appear before magistrates in the city on Monday morning, a Nottinghamshire police spokeswoman said tonight.
Moet Hennessy USA is debuting 10 Cane Rum, a superpremium product made from the first pressing of Trinidadian sugar cane, not from molasses.
a Trinidadian company jointly owned by John Wood Group PLC, has been awarded a contract valued at approximately $2 million to provide engineering and related services for B G Trinidad & Tobago Ltd.
position of unheralded Trinidadian Ames should be sitting even prettier.
DUNDEE UNITED boss Ian McCall is prepared to put more time and effort into bringing out the best of Trinidadian striker Collin Samuel.
Trinidadian airline BWIA is to launch direct flights to the Dominican Republic on Saturday (24 January).
As the cast of thirteen began to share cultural traditions, from Trinidadian folkloric dances to Zimbabwean tongue-clicking songs, a process of adaptation and transformation came into play.
The less interesting elements of King's discussion reflect the old paradox much discussed by James devotees: How could a native Trinidadian, jet-black at that, regional nationalist when young, key activist of Pan-Africanism during the 1930s-40s, and ardent supporter of Black Power in old age, define himself, his intellectual life and tastes, so often in European terms, from Shakespeare to cricket?
These apparatchiks in Hugo Boss suits who used to worship Lenin are now, as the old Trinidadian calypso song goes, 'working for the Yankee dollar.