Trinitarian

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Related to Trinitarianism: The Holy Trinity, The trinity

Trinitarian

1. a person who believes in the doctrine of the Trinity
2. a member of the Holy Trinity
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, some of his modern readers who most strongly argue for the indebtedness of his trinitarianism to Neoplatonism point precisely to the ascensus of De Trinitate.
Ultimately, then, these concepts are inferences about human nature as grounded ultimately in Cappacdocian trinitarianism.
2) Unitarianism, which rejects Trinitarianism and the divinity of Jesus, was Eliot's religious background.
They have wondered whether viable common theological ground can be achieved when, unlike Christians, Jews cannot see Trinitarianism (the doctrine that God exists in three, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit) in the plain meaning of Hebrew Scriptures.
But in this context Colin Gunton is quite incorrect to oppose Irenaean and Thomistic theology as sharply as he does when he states that Platonic forms are dominant in Aquinas's doctrine of creation and that "Aquinas' trinitarianism is not strong enough to extricate him from the danger of a slide into pantheism.
Leithart's book fails to address this as the source of Athanasius' problematic Biblicism and confused trinitarianism, which we must acknowledge ended up as a polytheism.
Trinity: The Classic Study of Biblical Trinitarianism.
He translated works and commented upon them, seeking to correct what he regarded as mistaken notions of some Christians who had discovered Asian resemblances to Trinitarianism (i.
On the one hand, they had a rich missionary past (the Byzantine and the Russian missions) and a dynamic theology which accepted local cultures and stressed the importance of trinitarianism and pneumatology.
How easy it is to understand the importance for the apostolic Roman hierarchy of the dispute between Manichaeanism and Trinitarianism.
Moreover, his defence of trinitarianism in particular can also be seen as relating him to the type of heterodox, strongly antivoluntaristic dissenting forms of Protestantism of thinkers like Bohme, and traceable back to the pre-nominalist, more Aristotelian-inflected approach of the 13th century and transmitted by the Dominicans.
93) Clearly, Dutch Anabaptist leaders were willing to use church councils and patristic evidence to justify their positions and assumed orthodox Trinitarianism.