Trinitarian

(redirected from Trinitarianism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Trinitarianism: The Holy Trinity, The trinity

Trinitarian

1. a person who believes in the doctrine of the Trinity
2. a member of the Holy Trinity
References in periodicals archive ?
The Trinitarian basis of the WCC is strong and sure, and true Trinitarianism always recognizes the activity of all the persons in each (and "God" suggests more than the First Person), but rhetorical signals from the themes in the intervening period suggest the Second Person is "more equal" than the others.
Its unitarian monotheism is philosophically and metaphysically more palatable to modern men and women than Trinitarianism.
only through a retrieval of the Trinitarianism that lies behind Edwards's theological ethics.
Here Pinn sketches doctrines such as tithing, Trinitarianism, sin and salvation, and scriptural authority.
In this regard, the absence of Pannenberg's trinitarianism, in which the Trinity is so crucial in the development of his overall systematic theology and doctrine of God, is surprising.
He accepted, nonetheless, that the division of God represented by trinitarianism formed a necessary "moment" in Christianity as a "historical form of revelation," required as a stabilizing corrective both to the logic of the incarnational theology that overcomes paganism and to the centrifugal, self-dividing momentum of the church that is the obverse of its unending outward thrust.
The trailblazer in the twentieth-century revival of trinitarianism was clearly Karl Barth.
Jurgen Moltmann addresses deficiencies in Abe's trinitarianism.
Yet, despite their pervasiveness over the past century and especially more recently through Colin Gunton, (6) Jurgen Moltmann, (7) and others, the sharp East-West dichotomy guiding such readings of Augustinian and Cappadocian trinitarianism no longer enjoys its previous status.
In theological terms, he forcefully objected to trinitarianism.
2) It has been concerned with whether Augustine's Trinitarianism is properly construed as privileging the essence over the persons, or whether it neglects the scriptural account of the "economic Trinity.
Moreover, once "the Trinitarianism that lies behind Edwards's theological ethics has been retrieved," his discussion of these topics will be seen to "exude a vitality that is largely absent from contemporary theology and ethics" (258).