trinucleotide repeat expansion

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trinucleotide repeat expansion

[‚trī¦nü·klē·ə‚tīd ri′pēt ik‚span·shən]
(genetics)
An increase in the number of copies of a trinucleotide that is normally already present in multiple adjacent copies. For example, the X-linked mental retardation 1 (XLMRI) locus in humans usually contains 6-50 tandem repeats of CCG, but this is expanded to 200-2000 copies in the fragile-X syndrome.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pathogenic examples related to trinucleotide repeats have their own collective name as trinucleotide repeat disorders. One of the best-known examples of these is Huntington's disease.
Trinucleotide repeat disorders. Ann Rev Neurosci 2007; 30: 575-621, doi: 10.1146/annurev.neuro.
The next major class is the trinucleotide repeat disorders. The classical example here is Fragile X, whereby a repeating CGG motif expansion (growing to over thousands of nucleotides in some cases) causes disease.
They cover the basic mechanisms of neurodegeneration, Alzheimer's disease and aging, tauopathies, synucleinopathies, trinucleotide repeat disorders, prion disorders, frontotemporal lobal degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders.