Tripartite scheme

Tripartite scheme

A type of design for a multistory commercial building often associated with the work of Louis Sullivan. The building’s facade is characterized by three major divisions: a base, consisting of the lower three stories; a cap, of one to three stories; and a shaft, consisting of the floors between the base and the cap.

tripartite scheme

A type of design for a multistory commercial building, often associated with the work of Louis H. Sullivan (1856–1924). The building’s façade is characterized by three principal divisions: a base consisting of the lowest two or three stories of the building; a cap, consisting of one to four stories, at the top of the building, and a shaft, consisting of the floors between the base and the cap. Such a building has a flat roof, projecting eaves, imposing arched or round-topped windows, vertical strips of windows separated by massive mullions, and massive arched doorways. In Sullivan’s designs, the decorative elements typically consist of highly ornate friezes with interwoven foliated designs in low relief (particularly in terra-cotta) that usually appear in spandrels, 1 and over entrances. See Sullivanesque.
References in periodicals archive ?
He also noted that the most natural way to do this is to increase their formal participation in the tripartite scheme and look for ways to do so within the next year.
Rather than a focused monograph on Gale's literary productions and life, however, Williams adopts an ambitious tripartite scheme of analysis, positioning Gale in relationship to two women writers whose place in the American canon seems now well assured, Willa Cather and Edith Wharton.
Luhmann, Granschloss is able to show in a first, highly theoretical chapter, some of the shortcomings of the classical tripartite scheme of exclusivism, inclusivism, and pluralism in response to the religious other, suggesting instead a more differentiated model of interreligious hermeneutics and perceptions, which not only includes the further categories of "exotieism/inferiorism" and "modality" but also suggests a much more nuanced tonality to address a multidimensional array of possibilities in interreligious hermeneutics.
True to the critique of the tripartite scheme in the first chapter, Grunschloss takes issue with John Hick's and others' definition of pluralism, which he perceives, true to his methodology, as "Inclusivism on a meta-systems level." More significant impulses, however, lie in Grunschloss's differentiated discussion of biblical theologies and images and their usefulness for a more open "theology of religions"; his emphasis on the search for truth as pilgrimage, together with his insistence on humility, is particularly apt and insightful.
This book is a very welcome addition to the discussion of the perception of the religious other and surely will aid in raising the discourse beyond the classical, somewhat simplistic, tripartite scheme. One would hope that the book will become available in an English translation.
However, in an indirect way she showed that they follow the tripartite scheme when she associated them with Kalabari funeral rooms.
She maintains that these dovetailed into the tripartite scheme of duein, oru, and owuamaba'pu
There is a remarkable pervasiveness of tripartite schemes in Kalabari, Eastern Niger Delta.
Law herself shows that people differed on this topic; she cannot show that the tripartite scheme was 'heretical' in the seventh century.
Conger frames this specific discussion with a tripartite scheme, identifying the significant phases and writings of Wollstonecraft's relationship with sensibility.
Here he finds a similar tripartite scheme, but now the first thanksgiving has been replaced by a series of christological motifs drawn from the paschal homilies of the second century.
Second, he seems to force all of the anaphoras he treats into a tripartite scheme and appears entirely to dismiss the research on the origins of thanksgiving sacrifice (zebach todah) made popular by C.