Troas

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Troas

(trō`ăs) or

the Troad

(trō`ăd), region about ancient TroyTroy,
ancient city made famous by Homer's account of the Trojan War. It is also called Ilion or, in Latin, Ilium. Its site is almost universally accepted as the mound now named Hissarlik, in Asian Turkey, c.4 mi (6.4 km) from the mouth of the Dardanelles.
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, on the northwest coast of Asia Minor, in present NW Turkey. Traversed by Mt. Ida (Kaz Daği) and strategically located on the Hellespont (Dardanelles), it was involved in various struggles to control the straits. Troas was the scene of the events of the Iliad and was an ancient center of Aegean civilization. The region has yielded to archaeologists a wealth of antiquities. For the Troas of the Bible, see Alexandria TroasAlexandria Troas
, ancient Greek seaport city, Mysia, NW Asia Minor, called Troas in the Bible. It was important under the Greeks and Romans.
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Troas

 

(the Troad), an ancient region in northwestern Asia Minor (present-day Turkey), bounded on the east by Mount Ida and its spurs. In the third millennium B.C., the tribes that settled in the region, finding the fertile Troas plain conducive to their development, established the kingdom of Troy, which flourished until its destruction during the Trojan War, circa 1260 B.C. Troas subsequently suffered a series of invasions—by the Lydians in the seventh century B.C., the Persians in the mid-sixth century B.C., and the Greeks, under Alexander the Great, in 334 B.C. From the third to the second century B.C., Troas was part of Pergamum. In 133 B.C. it became part of the Roman province of Asia.

Troas

the region of NW Asia Minor surrounding the ancient city of Troy
References in periodicals archive ?
In comparing the Hebrew epic traditions to those of Archaic and Classical Greece (the Homeric traditions), it is simply fascinating to chart the very similar debates about (1) the archaeology of Greece, the Troad, and the rest of Anatolia, (2) the Hittite epigraphic evidence very possibly equating Hittite Wilusa (Greek Ilios) with the mound of Hisarlik, and (3) shared methodological problems (erosion on sites that preclude clear answers about the history of the sites such as Late Bronze Age Hisarlik and Tel Es-Sultan/Jericho, for example).
Greek epic known as the Iliad is a reliable source of information about the city of Troy (modern Hisarlik) and its environs in the Troad in the Late Bronze Age.
There is unequivocal evidence too that there was a Mycenean presence in the Troad, and the kingdom of Ahhiyawa, very likely Homer's Achaea (mainland Greece), appears prominently as an aggressive power in contemporary diplomatic records of the Hittite king.
A gentleman and his wife can obtain a reduction' of ticket price, (Handbook for Travellers in Constantinople, Brusa, and the Troad.
I have sacked twelve of men's cities from my ships', Achilles says bitterly in Book 9 of the Iliad, `and I claim eleven more by land across the fertile Troad.
I projected an additional canto when I was in Troad and Constantinople," Byron had written to Dallas a month before learning of Edleston's death, "but under existing circumstances and sensations, I have neither harp, 'heart nor voice' to proceed" (7 September 1811; L, 2:92) - except, of course, to deplore his unimaginably worsened circumstances and sickened sensations in October.
He was the ancestor of the Dardanians of the Troad and, through Aeneas, of the Romans.
Yet surely he, when he hears of you and that you are still living, is gladdened within his heart and all his days he is hopeful that he will see his beloved son come home from the Troad.
According to Homer, he fought against the Greeks in the Trojan War and, after the sack of Troy, reigned in the Troad.
Mae hi wedi gorfod wynebu troad meddwl mawr, a gan nad oedd hi yno pan fu farw Meilyr, mae hi'n rhoi'r bai ar Hywel.
Does yr un Cymro wedi ennill ers troad y ganrif - tybed ai eleni fydd blwyddyn y Cymry?
Sites in the coastal Troad were clearly open to ideas from the Balkans at this time and also in contact, probably through trade, with the Aegean islands.