Trobriand Islands

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Trobriand Islands

(trō`brēănd', trō'brēănd`), small volcanic island group off SE New Guinea, part of Papua New Guinea. Kiriwana is the largest of the group's 22 islands. Yams, pearl shell, and trepang are the major products. The islands were made famous in the writings of anthropologist Bronislaw MalinowskiMalinowski, Bronislaw
, 1884–1942, English anthropologist, b. Poland, Ph.D. Univ. of Kraków, 1908. Working in the field of cultural anthropology, he gained renown through his studies (1914–18) of the indigenous peoples of the Trobriand Islands off New Guinea.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The following study is concerned with the codification of reality, and more particularly, with the nonlineal apprehension of reality among the people of the Trobriand Islands, in contrast to our own lineal phrasing.
(7.) Jutta Malnic and John Kasaipwalova, Kula: Myth and Magic in the Trobriand Islands (Sydney, Cowrie Books, 2000) 60, on ideas of beauty and adornment in the Trobriand Islands
Fortune disembarked from the freighter that transported him from England to the Trobriand Island of Dobu in Melanesia.
Quiza entonces la antropologia deberia desaparecer porque, para dar ejemplos, hoy gran parte de la poblacion de Trobriand vive en Nueva Zelanda o en Los Angeles.
Acne is ubiquitous in Western societies but absent in at least two non-Westernized populations (Kitavan people on the Trobriand Islands near Papua New Guinea and the Ache hunter-gatherers of Paraguay).
Through his analysis of The Argonauts of the Western Pacific, Stocking unveils the traces of a "euhemeristic foundational myth" where "the divinized heroes are not the Trobriand natives, but "the European Jason that brings back the Golden Fleece of ethnographic knowledge" (8).
The term "participant observation" was coined by Bronislaw Malinowski (1884-1942) during extensive work in the Trobriand Islands, where he embedded himself into native society, learning the language.