Trobriand Islands


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Trobriand Islands

(trō`brēănd', trō'brēănd`), small volcanic island group off SE New Guinea, part of Papua New Guinea. Kiriwana is the largest of the group's 22 islands. Yams, pearl shell, and trepang are the major products. The islands were made famous in the writings of anthropologist Bronislaw MalinowskiMalinowski, Bronislaw
, 1884–1942, English anthropologist, b. Poland, Ph.D. Univ. of Kraków, 1908. Working in the field of cultural anthropology, he gained renown through his studies (1914–18) of the indigenous peoples of the Trobriand Islands off New Guinea.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Malinowski, "War and weapons among the natives of the Trobriand Islands," Man, vol.
Building these structures required considerable effort and social networking as even in the Trobriand Islands they included stone slabs quarried on Woodlark Island (Austen 1939/40; Egloff 1979: 107; Bickler 2006).
Sexual Life of Savages in North-Western Melanesia: An Ethnographic Account of Courtship, Marriage and Family Life Among the Natives of the Trobriand Islands, British New Guinea.
So estranging views on color might be found among "us" in the West, but nevertheless it helps to look somewhere else, as did Malinowski, who during his fieldwork in the Trobriand Islands came across not just other colors but color as other.
Kiriwina, Trobriand Islands - played tribal cricket against Pacific Islanders during the colourful Mila Mala Festival
Like Malinowski's unforeseen internship in the Trobriand Islands during World War I, Leach's military service in Burma during World War II inadvertently facilitated his breaking loose from the anthropological model of intensive fieldwork in a single community, with limited generalization to larger social units.
Bronislaw Malinowski, Coral Gardens and Their Magic: A Study of the Methods of Tilling the Soil and of Agricultural Rites in the Trobriand Islands (New York, 1935).
1971 'Changing patterns of pottery trade to the Trobriand Islands', World Archaeology 3:197-209.
He has done research in the Trobriand Islands and Kiribati, among the Maasai of Tanzania, and among homeless women in Chicago, where he has taught since 1984.
* Crime and Custom in Savage Society, Bronislaw Malinowski's seminal work of legal anthropology, published in 1926, describes the early twentieth century legal culture of the Trobriand Islands in Melanesia.(43) Although many legal practices in Melanesian society seem vague, Malinowski describes a striking incident of what he regards as a paradigmatic exercise of criminal justice: A young man was having a sexual relationship with his maternal cousin, the daughter of his mother's sister -- a relationship that was prohibited by Trobriand law.
No thesps stand out in the middling ensemble job, the sexual politics are old had, and even pretty pictures of the Trobriand Islands aren't memorable.