Trobriand Islands

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Related to Trobriands: Kiriwina Islands

Trobriand Islands

(trō`brēănd', trō'brēănd`), small volcanic island group off SE New Guinea, part of Papua New Guinea. Kiriwana is the largest of the group's 22 islands. Yams, pearl shell, and trepang are the major products. The islands were made famous in the writings of anthropologist Bronislaw MalinowskiMalinowski, Bronislaw
, 1884–1942, English anthropologist, b. Poland, Ph.D. Univ. of Kraków, 1908. Working in the field of cultural anthropology, he gained renown through his studies (1914–18) of the indigenous peoples of the Trobriand Islands off New Guinea.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fortune disembarked from the freighter that transported him from England to the Trobriand Island of Dobu in Melanesia.
Whether it''s because of the heat, the constant humidity, the isolation, or the reversal of the gender power balance, the Trobriands are much more liberal than many other island communities in Papua New Guinea.
A product of interviews and close work with several villages in the Trobriand Islands over the course of several years, this book explores the impact of HIV/AIDS on the matrilineal Trobriand people, whose traditional culture includes sexual practices which directly contrast and work against HIV prevention methods.
In one remarkable case, Trobriand Islander traditions of flying witches (mulukwausi) bring together nearly the entire cluster of mythemes found in the South Asian and Roman lore reviewed to this point:
Within the Trobriands Conus valuables used in this way are classed as kitoum/kitomu, but as required can be placed in the kula (Berde 1983: 441; Damon 2002: 119; Weiner 1983: 161).
A Study of the Methods of Tiling the Soil and of Agricultural Rites in the Trobriand Islands.
However, many of the paradigmatic studies that were used to support this claim have been shown to be unreliable, including Mead's study of adolescent sexuality in Samoa, Benedict's studies of Japanese culture, Benjamin Whorf's study of the Hopi language, and Branislaw Malinowski's supposed counterexample to the Oedipus Complex among the Trobriand.
Gift giving in Trobriand clan sociality, depicted in "Neighbors lend helping hands," illustrates how group photographs tend to portray a determined, coordinated, forward-looking Other (Theroux and Essick 1992:126).
Beyond need, utility, or gain, the main feature of the Trobriand islanders in Malinowski's Argonauts of the Western Pacific appears to be a spontaneous "impulse to display, to share, to bestow"--the ethos of "giving for the sake of giving" (Argonauts 96; 175).
To put it another way, Whyte's early experiences were something like Malinowski's four years in the Trobriands.
Siuai Sugbuhanon Sumbanese Tanimbarese Tannese Tasmanians Tikopia Tiwi Tobelorese Tokelau Toradja Trobriands Ulawans Ulithians Vanua Levu Walbiri (*) Wantoat Wikmunkan Wogeo Wongaibon Yapese (*) North American Societies (of 69 culture clusters, 64 sampled) Acoma Antarianunts Apache, West.
In the Trobriands, chiefs alone are allowed many wives.