Tromsø

(redirected from Tromso)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Tromsø

(trôms`ö', tro͝oms`ö'), city (1995 pop. 55,577), capital of Troms co., NW Norway, on the island of Tromsøy; chartered 1794. The chief city of arctic Norway, it has large herring fisheries and is a base for shipping and seal hunting. Manufactures include ships and rope. It is also a starting point for cruise ships. In World War II, the German battleship Tirpitz was sunk (Nov. 12, 1944) by British planes just off Tromsø.

Tromsø

 

a city in northern Norway, on a small island near the island of Sørkvaløy in the Norwegian Sea. Capital of the fylke (county) of Troms. Population, 42,000 (1974). Tromso is a fishing port. Industry is represented by metalworking and fish processing.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Taken at Tromso, Norway, last month these amazing pictures show a sight most of us will never see.
The customer, Tromso City, will use the system to provide passengers with travel information in real time, and to monitor and control its city bus operations.
There were a few eyebrows raised when it was announced Barlow had agreed to a four-month loan move to Tromso earlier this summer, but it is credit to the youngster that the loan has been a success so far.
Tromso, who are bottom after ten matches, had no representatives in that U20 squad but recorded a shock win over Molde last time out.
Roald Amundsen left from Tromso on his doomed flight to rescue a rival.
Magnetic North Travel is offering a free dinner upgrade (worth PS60) at the Ice Domes on three-night Tromso Northern Lights activity breaks this winter.
WIM Chardine Cheradee Camacho, who played board in Tromso, is also being considered for further training.
Reportedly, this port terminal is a signal building in Tromso and a hub for all travellers both on land and at sea.
These clinics are located in Trondheim in The Central Norway Regional Health Authority (Helse Midt-Norge RHF) and in Tromso in Northern Norway Regional Health Authority (Helse Nord RHF) with main operations in plastic surgery and orthopedics.
The final day is spent kayaking on the tranquil strait between Kvaloya and Tromso. We paddle past the eerie spot where, in November 1944, the Tirpitz, feared sister-ship to the Bismarck, was sunk with the loss of almost 1,000 lives.
But as I trudge through the sludgy, icy streets of Norwegian city Tromso, it's hard to determine who the original bona fide residents really are.