Tropaeolum


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Tropaeolum

 

a genus of sometimes tuberous and frequently climbing perennial or annual herbaceous plants of the family Tropaeolaceae. The stems are succulent and branching. The alternate leaves are most often long-petioled, peltate, lobed, or palmatipartite. The axillary, solitary flowers are usually large, bisexual, zygomorphic, and spurred; they are yellow, orange, or red. There are five sepals; the corolla, which usually has five petals, is sometimes bilabiate. The fruit is a schizocarp and consists of three single-seeded carpels.

There are approximately 80 species of Tropaeolum, distributed primarily in South America in forests and thickets from Peru to Colombia and Venezuela, mainly in the Andes. Most species are ornamentals. The best-known annual forms of Tropaeolum are hybrid varieties of the garden nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) and of a number of other species. These hybrids are united under the name of X T. cultorum. Tuberous species are raised in greenhouses; the tubers of some species are edible. The buds and immature fruits can be used like capers.

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maxima, Nicotiana glauca y Agave americana en las zonas bajas y medias de cardonalestabaibales y bosques termofilos; de Ricinus communis y Arundo donax en los ambientes con humedad edafica; o de Tropaeolum majus y Centranthus ruber en comunidades herbaceas o rupicolas de sitios frescos y humedos.
Despite its name, like the rest of the Tropaeolum family its roots are in central and South America where another useful climber can be found.
Plant and preparation of Tropaeolum tuberosum paste.--Tubers were obtained from Ayacucho city (Ayacucho, Peru, at 2700 m of altitude) and were identified in the Departameto de Botanica of Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.
O material vegetal constituiu-se de flores, folhas e caules de Tropaeolum majus coletado no municipio de Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, conforme exsicatas HDSI144 depositadas no herbario do Departamento de Botanica da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria.
I hesitate to mention another nasturtium, the flame creeper, Tropaeolum speciosum ,because it is not hardy in many parts of the North -or at least does not often flourish.
Even easier using the same treatment is one of my favourites, the showy tuberous climber Tropaeolum tuberosum 'Ken Aslet'.
If you're sowing seeds at the moment, why not throw in some Tropaeolum majus, which we all know as nasturtiums - they fill up any blank spaces really well and look great in a bright tropical scheme.
The canary creeper, tropaeolum peregrinum, can be used in the same way, with its bright yellow flowers and its close relative, commonly known as nasturtium, tropaeolum majus will scramble up anything if given the chance - it will also cascade downwards if your circumstances allow for this.
The red flame flower, Tropaeolum speciosum, is an excellent supporting player for the dark green leaves of a yew hedge because once established it continually throws up new shoots to replace those that die back or are cut back when pruning the yew.
* Nasturtium Tropaeolum ( This climbing annual is a favourite of many bees.
The nasturtium originated in South America, though its botanical name, tropaeolum, was taken from the Greek and Latin battlefield words for trophy - a tree trunk festooned by the winners with the losers' bloodied helmets and shields.