Troparion

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Troparion

 

a verse prayer or hymn of the Orthodox Church in honor of a holy day or saint. The troparion originated in Byzantium as a reworking of hymns based on biblical and other sacred texts. The melodies of the troparion were recitative in character, with a series of syllables sung on one note.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A comparison between two almost identical Greek troparia is instructive (see tables 13-14).
These can be placed in comparison with two Russian troparia, adding to the model some personal facts (see tables 15-16).
It is noteworthy that it was not uncommon for monastic communities on the local level to compose services or at least special hymns (troparia and kontakia) in honor of an icon of the Mother of God specially revered in their particular locale.
All this tends to suggest that the music for the Office of the Genuflexion is a survival from the period when the Psaltikon and Asmatikon repertories were not distinguished, the closest parallel to it being perhaps the Slavonic forms of the troparia and psalms for Christmas Eve and Epiphany Eve; and that it just so happens that this music has not been preserved in Slavonic manuscripts but can be found in a few southern Italian manuscripts, nearly all of which have been associated with S Salvatore, Messina.
The story related in the first item of Gerbert's Scriptores ecclesiastici, of how Abba Pambo reproaches a young monk for being impressed with the 'canons' and 'troparia' of the Alexandrian churches, is apocryphal; it does not appear in the authentic sayings of Pambo and has the appearance of being from the sixth century, when one might well expect to hear that sort of thing from an Eastern monk.(13) But austerity aside, the simple existence of monastic psalmody 'in course' is what is at issue here; it was a psalmody that moved psalm by psalm through the Psalter, rather than selecting appropriate psalms, and one that was pervasive in monastic life rather than occasional.