Trophonius


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Trophonius

(trəfō`nēəs), in Greek mythology, famous architect. He and his brother Agamedes built the temple of Apollo at Delphi and the treasury of King Hyrieus. According to one legend, Trophonius was swallowed up by the earth at Lebadea in Boeotia, which became the site of a famous subterranean oracle.
References in classic literature ?
The second part is not later than 600 B.C.; for 1) the chariot-races at Pytho, which commenced in 586 B.C., are unknown to the writer of the hymn, 2) the temple built by Trophonius and Agamedes for Apollo (ll.
There is the Trophonius' cave in which, by some artifice, the leaden Tritons are made not only to spout water, but to play the most dreadful groans out of their lead conchs--there is the nymphbath and the Niagara cataract, which the people of the neighbourhood admire beyond expression, when they come to the yearly fair at the opening of the Chamber, or to the fetes with which the happy little nation still celebrates the birthdays and marriage-days of its princely governors.
"Trophonius of Lebadea: Mystery Aspects of an Oracular Cult in Boeotia." In
Trophonius' den, Hecla in Iceland, AEtna in Sicily, to descend and
When [the tragic philosopher] appears in the sixth and fifth centuries, among the enormous dangers and temptations and increasing secularization, walking as it were out of the cave of Trophonius straight into the midst of the lavish luxuriance, the pioneer freedom, the wealth and sensuality of the Greek colonies, we may suspect that he comes, a distinguished warning voice, to express the same purpose of which the Orphic mysteries hint in the grotesque hieroglyphics of their rites.
In a typical exchange, when teased by a friend about her interest in reform, Irene retorts "because I abhor Brook-Farm, I will not take refuge in the cave of Trophonius" (262).
Within the tragic plot, these questions are verbalised by none else than Ion himself, who asks 'Is the god truthful or does he prophesy falsely?' (48) The course of the tragic plot will reveal that Apollo's oracle (and that of Trophonius) becomes true not in an absolute sense, but for different characters in different ways.
Farnell, among those who received these honours the following sub-groups can be discerned: 'heroes of divine or daimonic origin' (such as Trophonius, Linus, Ino-Leucothea); 'sacral heroes' (Aineias, Iphigeneia, Amphiaraus, Melampous); 'functional heroes', whose names are in fact nothing more than appellative epithets; and also Heracles, the Dioscuroi, Asclepius, each of whom is taken as a category in his own right; the heroes of the Homeric epics; and, finally, historical figures who became objects of a hero-cult.(23)
In the palpable darkness of encompassing abstraction he is "not without a chilly sensation of terror." Furthermore, if the truth be known, he wants no part of "immediate intuition" or direct knowledge of truth, which Coleridge had claimed was the means to circumvent the inadequacy of "mere words." The friend declares that he is unwilling to descend with the author into the dark cave of Trophonius, "there to rub my own eyes, in order to make the sparks and figured flashes, which I am required to see" (I.302).
The oracle of Trophonius, in Boeotia, was perhaps the most awesome.
Trophonius is celebrated in Greek legend as the builder of the temple of Apollo at Delphi.