trophosome


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trophosome

[′träf·ə‚sōm]
(invertebrate zoology)
The nutritional zooids of a hydroid colony.
References in periodicals archive ?
Female (n=13): body length: 8.2 mm [+ or -] 4.42 (7.8810.50), width of the head at the level of cephalic papillae: 88 [micro]m [+ or -] 6 (67-92), width of the body at the level of nerve ring: 152 [micro]m [+ or -] 22 (114-176), greatest width of body: 247 [micro]m [+ or -] 26 (198-272), width of the body at vulva: 280 [micro]m [+ or -] 34 (212-297), distance from head to the nerve ring: 360 [micro]m [+ or -] 42 (325-410), width of the body at posterior end of the trophosome: 211 [micro]m [+ or -] 25 (196-236), length of vagina: 611.75 [micro]m [+ or -] 45 (576-665), width of vagina: 48 [micro]m [+ or -] 10 (32-58), length of amphidial pouch: 24 [micro]m, width of amphidial pouch: 22 [micro], V%: 48 [+ or -] 2 (48-52).
The discovery of symbionts within the internal trophosome tissue of the giant tube-worm Riftia pachyptila Jones, 1981 solved the mystery of how this and many other animal species function with reduced or absent digestive systems (Cavanaugh et al., 1981).
and trophosome tissue of Ridgeia piscesae, also from Middle Valley, were 0.49 and 1.61 [micro]mol S/g dry wt/min respectively, about two and about six times the activity found in the Adipicola MV gill.
In all of them the trunk region is the longest section and houses the gonads and the trophosome. However, homology of the body regions across groups is debatable (Southward, 1980; Rouse, 2001; Rouse and Pleijel, 2001).
In the small polychaete family Siboglinidae Caullerery, 1914 (McHugh, 1997; Rouse and Fauchald, 1997; Rouse et al., 2004), consisting of Vestimentifera, Sclerolinum, Osedax, and Frenulata, all representatives--with the exception of Osedax dwarf males (Rouse et al., 2004)--apparently have a symbiont-housing organ, called a trophosome, originating from different germ lines.
(1995), which in some echinoderm integumental tissues were more than 10[sup9] SCB cells g[.sup.-1] ash free dry weight ([greater than 10[sup8] SCB cells g[.sup.-1] tissue wet weight), a value similar to that of chemoautotrophic bacteria in the trophosome of the hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila, which are assumed to be important in supplying energy to their host (Cavanaugh et al., 1981).
Tubeworms are devoid of a mouth or digestive tract, and host their intracellular chemoautotrophic bacteria within a vascularized organ called the trophosome (Cavanaugh et al., 1981; Felbeck, 1981).
This organ, called a trophosome, is perfused with a blood-vascular system to facilitate transport of nutrients to and from endosymbionts (Southward et al., 2005).
To characterize the symbionts, we excised a small piece (~1 [cm.sup.3]) of symbiont-bearing trophosome tissue from each worm and extracted total DNA with the DNeasy isolation kit (Qiagen Inc., Valencia, CA).
The non-muscular esophagus, vestigial as only a cuticular tube in fourth stage larvae (J4s) and adults, passes through the pigmented region and the ganglionic region (associated with the nerve ring) and into the trophosome, a food-storage body (Figs.
As adults, they lack a functional digestive system and derive their nutrition from chemoautotrophic microbial symbionts hosted in a specialized tissue, the trophosome, located in their elongated trunk region (see Bright and Giere, 2005).