tropical rainforest

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tropical rainforest

[′träp·ə·kəl ′rān‚fär·əst]
(ecology)
A vegetation class consisting of tall, close-growing trees, their columnar trunks more or less unbranched in the lower two-thirds, and forming a spreading and frequently flat crown; occurs in areas of high temperature and high rainfall. Also known as hylaea; selva.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the conclusions of such studies can be applied to the analysis of succession in tropical rain forests, especially in the early successional stages when seed dispersal and seedling spatial distribution are critical.
This initial work suggested that tropical rain forests existed in southern Yunnan, but these forests were considered to be different from those in Indo-Malaysia (Fedorov, 1957, 1958) because of the lack of representatives of the Dipterocarpaceae, which dominates rain forests in tropical Asia.
Proceeds will help save and preserve tropical rain forests.
His report on the current state of tropical rain forests covers expected topics -- deforestation, loss of biodiversity, and climate change -- however, Martin takes these topics into a nuanced realm, explaining concepts like "cover change," "forest fragmentation," and "carbon storage." Such concepts are couched within the larger problem of delivery in non-English-speaking countries -- and inversely, especially with African languages, not being well understood among English-speaking scientists.
Reportedly, Greenpeace had issued an email manifesto to Mattel before the demonstration alleging that Barbie's wrapping was made from a company whose products added to the deforestation of Indonesia's tropical rain forest.
Previous studies have identified characteristics common to all, or at least most, tropical rain forests around the world, leading much of the public, and even non-specialist scientists to assume they are basically all the same.
Perhaps not surprisingly, there is a slightly steeper drop-off in concern about several issues that aren't directly related to daily survival, such as the loss of tropical rain forests and urban sprawl.
Some like it hot, including the plants living in South America's tropical rain forests 56 million years ago.
The new results show that temperate conifer forests have the tallest canopies (above 131 feet), boreal forests typically less than 66 feet and tropical rain forests were about 82 feet tall.
Many of our houseplants originated in the tropical rain forests of Central Africa, Central and South America, or Southeast Asia.
The country also boasts of towering snow-capped mountain peaks, vast valleys, tropical rain forests and stunning beaches.

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