Trotsky


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Trotsky

, Trotski
Leon, original name Lev Davidovich Bronstein. 1879--1940, Russian revolutionary and Communist theorist. He was a leader of the November Revolution (1917) and, as commissar of foreign affairs and war (1917--24), largely created the Red Army. He was ousted by Stalin after Lenin's death and deported from Russia (1929); assassinated by a Stalinist agent
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Tampoco entrare en las consideraciones filosoficas que podrian surgir de este asunto; y ello no solo porque implicarian otro tipo de escrito, que seguramente elaborare en un momento mas avanzado de mi investigacion, sino porque los acontecimientos mismos que rodearon los juicios a Trotsky (tanto los que se hicieron sin su presencia en Moscu como las audiencias que presidio Dewey en Ciudad de Mexico) no son suficientemente conocidos entre el publico filosofico del mundo de habla hispana y muchas veces han sido ocultados de forma deliberada, o al menos falseados, para responder a oscuros intereses politicos.
The three men most associated with that dictatorship were Lenin, Trotsky, and Joseph Stalin.
This is the ongoing efforts of the Soviet state under dictation from Stalin the new, murderous Czar, to link "criminal plot" to subvert the Soviet state after "criminal plot" to the machinations of Trotsky, supposedly orchestrated from abroad.
"I suddenly thought, the world's full of these extraordinary causes and injustices and here's this guy Trotsky, who was so inspired he went out to create a Russian revolution and change the world.
Between January and March 1917, Trotsky found refuge in New York City.
But Mr Corbyn's team reacted furiously after Mr Watson accused "Trotsky entryists" of returning to Labour.
"They are caucusing and factionalising and putting pressure where they can, and that's how Trotsky entryists operate.
As a fatally ill Lenin lay dying amid the wreckage of the young Soviet Republic, a powerful current headed by Joseph Stalin initiated a set of developments that would dislodge the preeminent Trotsky. Stalin, at the intersection of two apparatuses (the Communist Party and the Soviet state), represented an immense bureaucracy determined to preserve its power and privileges while modernizing--soon with extreme brutality--the new Soviet society.
The first three articles look at the transnational networks which allowed Trotsky, during his years of exile after 1928, to continue to communicate his political message internationally--even if his circle of supporters was always limited--and to search for asylum in Western Europe, away from Stalin's Secret Police which monitored his every move in Turkey and already caused him to fear for his life.
Hoidal, Trotsky in Norway: Exile, 1935-1937- 414 pp.