trouvères

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trouvères

(tro͞ovĕr`), medieval poet-musicians of central and N France, fl. during the later 12th and the 13th cent. The trouvères imitated the troubadourstroubadours
, aristocratic poet-musicians of S France (Provence) who flourished from the end of the 11th cent. through the 13th cent. Many troubadours were noblemen and crusader knights; some were kings, e.g.
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 of the south. Written in the dialect called langue d'oïl, their songs include love lyrics, romances, and the heroic chansons de gestechansons de geste
[Fr.,=songs of deeds], a group of epic poems of medieval France written from the 11th through the 13th cent. Varying in length from 1,000 to 20,000 lines, assonanced or (in the 13th cent.
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. Chief among the trouvères were Conon de Béthune, Le Châtelain de Coucy, Colin Muset, Renaut de Beaujeu, and Adam de la HalleAdam de la Halle
or Adam le Bossu
, c.1240–1287, French dramatist and poet-musician, one of the great trouvères. Many of his songs and polyphonic motets are preserved, as is the pastoral comedy with music Le Jeu de Robin et Marion (c.1283).
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References in periodicals archive ?
All translations from troubadours and trouveres are from Goldin.
(In that sense, Orledge's reference to the 'trouveres' is entirely appropriate; and there are more or less authentic archaisms in Satie's language that point in the same direction, most obviously the omission of the subject pronoun in the very first line.) However, by 1914, after twenty-five years of free verse, the experiments of Banville and Verlaine had lost their cutting edge.
See Daniel Leech-Wilkinson, The Modern Invention of Medieval Music (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002); and John Haines, Eight Centuries of Troubadours and Trouveres: The Changing Identity of Medieval Music (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004).
We had met after an Ashbury Trouveres opening night but last week, when I saw her--perhaps it wasn't her, I have allowed for that possibility--I felt that this event had never occurred, that what I was remembering was the production--make-believe, fiction, theatre--and that I had led another life, elsewhere and with someone else.
Poesia de trovadores, trouveres, minnesinger (de principios del siglo XII a fines del siglo XIII).
The pastorela was, however, well received in the north where many trouveres, including Jean Bodel--who is often cited as the first fableor (3)--composed their own pastourelles in langue d'oil.
This fusion of words and music that continues today is hardly a new one; in medieval France, performers known as troubadours and trouveres journeyed from city to city, singing secular songs written in vernacular French.
Camoes, en immortalisant sous la forme epique ce fait culminant de la civilisation contemporaine, dota l'humanite d'un livre qui fut pour la Renaissance ce que le Vieux testament fut pour le monde hebraique, l'Iliade pour le monde grec, l'Eneide pour le monde romain, la poesie des trouveres pour le monde feodal et la Divine comedie pour l'unification de l'esprit catholique.
His mastery of earlier forms has led some to call him the last of the trouveres, a class of poet-musicians who flourished in northern France in the 12th and 13th centuries
Lyrics of the Troubadours and Trouveres. Garden City, NY: Doubleday/Anchor, 1973.
Not a dialect of French but rather a linguistic ancestor derived directly from Latin, it was amorously employed by traveling trouveres since the time of Eleanor of Aquitaine.
(2) La Technique Poetique des Trouveres dans la Chanson Courtoise (Bruges: De Tempel.