24-bit color

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24-bit color

Using three bytes per pixel in a display system (eight bits for each red, green and blue subpixel). Also called "True Color" and "RGB color," a total of 16,777,216 colors can be represented in the color palette. See color depth, 8-bit color and bit specifications.
References in periodicals archive ?
A truecolor image is obtained by combining a red, a green, and a blue visible wavelength band, for example, with the Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on board the Suomi NPP and JPSS satellites, that would be, respectively, the M4 (or II), M3, and M2 bands.
Red, green, and blue correspond to elements of the three dimensional matrix that represents the TrueColor image recorded by the camera.
According to Panay, the Surface Studio's display is designed to immerse the user as much as possible. The display includes a feature Microsoft is calling TrueColor, which allows creators to "render the world...as he or she believes it needs to be rendered." The Surface Studio's monitor can switch from DCI-P3 color and RGB on the fly, which is going to appeal to graphic designers.
The clear black 4.7" OLED display features scratch-resistant Corning Gorilla Glass 3 with wide viewing angles, HD720-(t250-X 7 2 0) resolution with 316 pixels per inch, TrueColor (24-bit/16M), and sunlight readability enhancements.
There is an old paper about wavelength selection problem for truecolor holography [30].
today brightens your video calls with TrueColor Technology, a groundbreaking new image processing technology that provides superior color and brightness in even the worst lighting conditions.
Additionally, its 1920 x 1200 resolution and TrueColor technology provide sharp and brilliant images.
The original marketer, Ott-Lite Technology, positions itself at the high end, touting its scientific blends of phosphors in lamps for reading and computing (VisionSaver), crafting (TrueColor), and seasonal affective disorder (Natural Supplement Lighting).
In addition to the new platform support, the latest release also offers Universal PDF printing, security enhancements, broader network compatibility, and TrueColor support for 24 Bit Color Windows applications.
Al Kelly, Richard Berry, Chuck Shaw, and I wrote about the basic techniques for LRGB and WCMY imaging in our article, "TrueColor CCD Imaging" (S&T: December 1998, page 142); you can also read about it on Kelly's Web site at www.ghgcorp .com/akelly/artdraf7.htm.