trumpeter

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trumpeter

[′trəm·pəd·ər]
(vertebrate zoology)
A bird belonging to the Psophiidae, a family with three South American species; the common trumpeter (Psophia crepitans) is the size of a pheasant and resembles a long-legged guinea fowl.
References in periodicals archive ?
com)-- Jump City Music is thrilled to announce the release of the debut solo album from trumpeter Bob Wagner.
If the trumpeters were not otherwise unrecorded Chinese visitors to England but came from Frobisher's ships, as seems most likely, the next question is whether they were English.
GREAT SOUND: Jazz trumpeter Jay Phelps plays the Lawrence Batley Theatre
They include Nils Petter Molvaer doing his thing on Jack Johnson/Black Satin; Paolo Fresu on a Gurtu/Cherry medley of Cosmic Roundabout and Brown Rice; the Lebanese four-valve trumpeter Ibrahim Maalouf adding his quartertones to Gurtu's equally microtonal drums - surely a marriage made in heaven; and the young American trumpet sensation Ambrose Akinmusire alongside classical trumpeter Matthias Hofs playing a double-bell instrument for All Blues.
But the surname is nonetheless Lamb on his testament dative, his children's baptismal records, the records of the Life Guards and the Royal Trumpeters, and on a number of receipts in the National Archives of Scotland that bear his signature (Figure 2).
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE: Air Cadet Trumpeters Sgt Alice Hartopp and Cdt Kane Dicken play the Wedding March at Amiee and Richard's wedding
IF THERE'S one jazzman guaranteed to liven up a midweek lunchtime at the pub, it's the expansive and explosive trumpeter Bruce Adams, many times British Jazz Award winner.
The septet (pianist and music director Bill Charlap, trumpeter Nicholas Payton, alto saxophonist Steve Wilson, tenor saxophonist Ravi Coltrane, guitarist Peter Bernstein, bassist Peter Washington, and drummer Lewis Nash) played a solid 90-minute set with no intermission, giving the musicians a chance to stretch out on seven classic compositions, all of them penned by jazz musicians associated with Blue Note.
This isn't just a history of the instrument's development: it's a survey of its musical, social, political and economic heritage charting its evolution through major contributors, blending in the insights and perceptions of fellow jazz trumpeters who share their stories and philosophies.
Because they so closely resemble the tundra swan, trumpeters can also become casualties during tundra swan hunts, which are legal in the Dakotas, North Carolina, Virginia and a handful of western states.
Particularly fascinating for its report on "individuals" is the 75-page "register of musicians" at the end of the book: it presents, with full documentary support, hundreds of cathedral singers, wind players, cathedral organists and organ builders, palace trumpeters and shawm players, town criers, drummers, and other palace instrumentalists.
The basic group consists of Payton on trumpet, Tim Warfield on tenor sax, Anthony Wonsey on piano, Reuben Rogers on bass, and Adonis Rose on drums, augmented by Roy Hargrove and Wynton Marsalis on trumpet on a few cuts (all three trumpeters playing together on the aptly titled, "The Three Trumpeters") and Joshua Redman on tenor sax on one cut.