Truth-Value


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Truth-Value

 

(in logic), the value that a proposition assumes, relative to the content reflected in it. In ordinary (classical) logic two truth-values are used—“true” and “false.” In many-valued logic propositions are examined that can assume a greater number of truth values; for example, in three-valued logic there are three truth-values, which may be interpreted as “true,” “false,” or “indeterminate.”

References in periodicals archive ?
According to the meteorological center, the neutrosophic truth-value of P is:
A mathematical sentence does not have a truth-value unless it is used to deduce concrete sentences from other concrete sentences.
As long as one of the conditions is met, it is the truth-value, and continue to test the next sampling point.
To then arrive at the truth-value of the proposition Men and women are created equal, the conditions guaranteeing its truth must necessarily be sufficient for it to be true.
Steglich-Petersen argues that it is relevant to the truth-value of a contrastive causal claim what would have occurred instead of the cause.
Selecting among these operators requires, in addition to truth-value of the antecedents, a judgment of the correlation between two statements.
In short, the ideal representation has a representation gap, but there is no truth-value gap.
What methods indicate must somehow match truth-value in salient worlds.
A sentence can have truth-value only if each of its constituents has Bedeutung.
Fackler claims that media monopolies are rational responses of shareholders to good-risk ventures which portend profit, resulting from buyout and mergers negotiated for cost-benefit advantage: a socially responsible press must entertain diversity, respect contradictory hermeneutical traditions, and be free to seek truth under all its varied disguises (the truth-value of mass-mediated messages is precarious).
First, the truth-value of the logical product of the inner and outer functions is equal to the truth-value of the function that is constituted so that the argument of the inner function has the outer function as an attribute.